RC2 + VS 2008 extremly slow

Hi,

i have a class file in my project which has about 10.000 lines of code. The code is generated by MyGeneration and it's purpose is to
initialize the tables, data adapters and sql commands for a complex Dataset. When i open this file in the Visual Studio 2008 Editor
i notice that my cpu load is at about 95% to 100% for two or three minutes and the reactivity of Windows XP is extremly bad.

I know this is not the normal case. For myself i would never write such huge classes. But code generators may do. Is there any way
to exclude specific files from the normal analysis process of R# like you have built in for the solutionwide error analysis ? If
not, it would be great if you can implement such a functionality. I think this will also be interesting for files which uses the C#
3.0 features which are not supported by R#.

Regards
Klaus

3 comments
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Hello,

As far as I remember, there's no functionality for selectively excluding
the files from R# analysis. Moreover, if you totally exclude the file, the
symbols defined in that file will appear unresolved throughout the project.
That's the main problem when you consider excluding individual files.

I think it may help to change the file extension.

Besides, R# has an action called “EnableDaemon” that suspends most of the
analysing. Unfortunately, it's not per-file, but still can be put to use.


Serge Baltic
JetBrains, Inc — http://www.jetbrains.com
“Develop with pleasure!”


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Serge Baltic wrote:

Hello,

As far as I remember, there's no functionality for selectively excluding
the files from R# analysis. Moreover, if you totally exclude the file,
the symbols defined in that file will appear unresolved throughout the
project. That's the main problem when you consider excluding individual
files.

This is a point i didn't think about.


Besides, R# has an action called “EnableDaemon” that suspends most of
the analysing. Unfortunately, it's not per-file, but still can be put to
use.

I have found the action in the keyboard mapping. How does this action work?
Is the analyzing process suspended until i close Visual Studio or can i reenable
it by pressing Ctrl+8 again?


Regards
Klaus


P.S.: By the way, as you are talking about keyboard shortcuts. Why the hell did you change
the shortcuts for the standard functions (eg "Refactor This" from F2 to Ctrl-R-R)?
If you upgrade from 2.5 to 3.0 you will have a great learning curve until you are
as fast as before.

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Hello,

I have found the action in the keyboard mapping. How does this action
work?
Is the analyzing process suspended until i close Visual Studio or can
i reenable it by pressing Ctrl+8 again?


It works the toggle way. The current status is given away by the indicator
rectangle on the Error Stripe to the right of the text editor. It's dead-gray
when disabled, and whichever color or an animation when live.

P.S.: By the way, as you are talking about keyboard shortcuts. Why the
hell did you change
the shortcuts for the standard functions (eg "Refactor This" from F2
to Ctrl-R-R)?


The Refactor This context menu is bound to CtrlShiftR in either version.
You're probably talking about the particular Rename refactoring.

If you upgrade from 2.5 to 3.0 you will have a great learning curve
until you are as fast as before.


The R# 2.5 keybindings were based on IDEA ones which in turn were based on
some R.I.P. Borland Java IDE which in turn was probably keeping them since
DOS days. Oh, you know — BC++ 3.1, Norton Commander, that kind :) They were
not feeling like native in Visual Studio, though. That resulted in two things:
a huge learning curve for new R# users with VS background, and the significant
suppression of VS's own functionality when it came down to R#-less languages.
Yes, ones still exist, like C++ for instance.

For R# 3.0, a new keyboard scheme was developed from scratch, with ergonomics
and Visual Studio compatibility in mind. The legacy scheme is still actively
supported (which means all the new actions get their shortcuts in it too),
and the user is presented with a choice when he first runs such a double-powered
R# version.

This choice is where your 2.5–3.0 learning curve comes from.


Serge Baltic
JetBrains, Inc — http://www.jetbrains.com
“Develop with pleasure!”


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