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I've used CodeRush, which this addin is based on. It uses the CodeRush core. While pretty, all of it's functionality that is important to me is already done by resharper. CodeRush can also be a resource hog. Even on normal sized solutions, my devenv.exe process would sometimes pass the 400mb memory usage mark.

There is some functionality in these products I would like to see and these videos show that off well, but the eyecandy I can do without.

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I installed DevExpress ReFactor Pro! recently and after a couple of days I gladly came back to ReSharper. What I love about ReSharper is that is is so much more than a simple refactoring tool. I will not give up such things as "Find in Files". I love the way ReSharper does intellisense.

The guys at DevExpress might have a slick video presentation but, in my opinion, ReSharper remains the better of the two products by quite a stretch.

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The thing I don't like about CodeRush is that it tries to do too much out of the box in my opinion. The huge amounts of templates can make simply typing out a variable name that corresponds with a template auto-complete when you don't want to. And the solution? Type a few extra garbage characters to avoid keying the template, space afterwards, and then go back and "cut" the garbage characters.

And why should I have to make links? With Resharper if I want to rename something, no matter how great or small the scope, it's just a shift+f6 away.

It might just be my opinion, but CodeRush tries to be a jack-of-all-trades and ends up a master of none. Resharper doesn't claim to do as much, but what it does is really effective, and just helps me write better code faster.

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I watched the video and I tend to agree, although I have reservations about
installing CodeRush on my development computer given the criticisms I have
heard of it in this and other newsgroups. I do like some of the ideas that
are demonstrated in the video, such as the ability to decide where to move
code to. On the other hand, copying and pasting the code to another section
of the class may actually be easier in the long run.

One item on my Resharper wish list is a set of alternate shortcuts that
don't conflict with common Windows shortcuts. While Shift+F6 is effective, I
prefer to keep that key bound to changing window panes so I can cross
reference sections of the code while looking for duplicates. I also found
that I needed to refer to the keybindings cheat sheet on a regular basis to
remember which keys to use for various refactorings. I finally went back to
the default shortcuts and manually bound Resharper to Ctrl+R bindings
(e.g.,Visual Studio 2005 Beta 2 style key bindings) that I think are more
logical. That is, CtrlR, CtrlR renames while CtrlR, CtrlM moves code.
While this style of binding is more logical to me (e.g., I don't need a
shortcut cheat sheet), I acknowledge that not everyone will like this idea.

--
Lothan


"Sam Smoot" <no_mail@jetbrains.com> wrote in message
news:31014273.1118975698334.JavaMail.itn@is.intellij.net...

The thing I don't like about CodeRush is that it tries to do too much out
of the box in my opinion. The huge amounts of templates can make simply
typing out a variable name that corresponds with a template auto-complete
when you don't want to. And the solution? Type a few extra garbage
characters to avoid keying the template, space afterwards, and then go
back and "cut" the garbage characters.

>

And why should I have to make links? With Resharper if I want to rename
something, no matter how great or small the scope, it's just a shift+f6
away.

>

It might just be my opinion, but CodeRush tries to be a jack-of-all-trades
and ends up a master of none. Resharper doesn't claim to do as much, but
what it does is really effective, and just helps me write better code
faster.



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To be honest, I almost always right-click and select an option from the
context menu. There are maybe a handful (like, five) of keyboard
combinations I've bothered to commit to memory, because I use them
relatively regularly (or they are similar to ones in IntelliJ IDEA, which I
used for several years): Ctrl-W, Ctrl-F12, Ctrl-Shift-F7, Ctrl-N, and
Ctrl-Shift-J. (add in the basic completion, and the tab key, and alt-enter
for quick fixes, and those are about all the Resharper keystrokes I use).

I do think your key binding idea is a good one, though... certainly easier
to remember than a lot of the existing short-cuts. I might suggest it to
some of my compatriots who like the keyboard (and hate the mouse) but also
are intimidated by the sheer number of new keystrokes to learn and/or
re-learn with Resharper.


"GREGORY LAW" <lothan@email.uophx.edu> wrote in message
news:d98ja1$l1i$1@is.intellij.net...
>I watched the video and I tend to agree, although I have reservations about
>installing CodeRush on my development computer given the criticisms I have
>heard of it in this and other newsgroups. I do like some of the ideas that
>are demonstrated in the video, such as the ability to decide where to move
>code to. On the other hand, copying and pasting the code to another section
>of the class may actually be easier in the long run.
>

One item on my Resharper wish list is a set of alternate shortcuts that
don't conflict with common Windows shortcuts. While Shift+F6 is effective,
I prefer to keep that key bound to changing window panes so I can cross
reference sections of the code while looking for duplicates. I also found
that I needed to refer to the keybindings cheat sheet on a regular basis
to remember which keys to use for various refactorings. I finally went
back to the default shortcuts and manually bound Resharper to Ctrl+R
bindings (e.g.,Visual Studio 2005 Beta 2 style key bindings) that I think
are more logical. That is, CtrlR, CtrlR renames while CtrlR, CtrlM
moves code. While this style of binding is more logical to me (e.g., I
don't need a shortcut cheat sheet), I acknowledge that not everyone will
like this idea.

>

--
Lothan

>
>

"Sam Smoot" <no_mail@jetbrains.com> wrote in message
news:31014273.1118975698334.JavaMail.itn@is.intellij.net...

>> The thing I don't like about CodeRush is that it tries to do too much out
>> of the box in my opinion. The huge amounts of templates can make simply
>> typing out a variable name that corresponds with a template auto-complete
>> when you don't want to. And the solution? Type a few extra garbage
>> characters to avoid keying the template, space afterwards, and then go
>> back and "cut" the garbage characters.
>>
>> And why should I have to make links? With Resharper if I want to rename
>> something, no matter how great or small the scope, it's just a shift+f6
>> away.
>>
>> It might just be my opinion, but CodeRush tries to be a
>> jack-of-all-trades and ends up a master of none. Resharper doesn't claim
>> to do as much, but what it does is really effective, and just helps me
>> write better code faster.
>



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One item on my Resharper wish list is a set of alternate shortcuts
that don't conflict with common Windows shortcuts. While Shift+F6 is
effective, I prefer to keep that key bound to changing window panes so


By the way, in ReSharper 2.0 we changed shortcut for Rename to F2 (which
seems to be more logical).

Valentin Kipiatkov
Chief Scientist, Vice President of Product Development
JetBrains, Inc
http://www.jetbrains.com
"Develop with pleasure!"

I watched the video and I tend to agree, although I have reservations
about installing CodeRush on my development computer given the
criticisms I have heard of it in this and other newsgroups. I do like
some of the ideas that are demonstrated in the video, such as the
ability to decide where to move code to. On the other hand, copying
and pasting the code to another section of the class may actually be
easier in the long run.

One item on my Resharper wish list is a set of alternate shortcuts
that don't conflict with common Windows shortcuts. While Shift+F6 is
effective, I prefer to keep that key bound to changing window panes so
I can cross reference sections of the code while looking for
duplicates. I also found that I needed to refer to the keybindings
cheat sheet on a regular basis to remember which keys to use for
various refactorings. I finally went back to the default shortcuts and
manually bound Resharper to Ctrl+R bindings (e.g.,Visual Studio 2005
Beta 2 style key bindings) that I think are more logical. That is,
CtrlR, CtrlR renames while CtrlR, CtrlM moves code. While this
style of binding is more logical to me (e.g., I don't need a shortcut
cheat sheet), I acknowledge that not everyone will like this idea.

"Sam Smoot" <no_mail@jetbrains.com> wrote in message
news:31014273.1118975698334.JavaMail.itn@is.intellij.net...

>> The thing I don't like about CodeRush is that it tries to do too much
>> out of the box in my opinion. The huge amounts of templates can make
>> simply typing out a variable name that corresponds with a template
>> auto-complete when you don't want to. And the solution? Type a few
>> extra garbage characters to avoid keying the template, space
>> afterwards, and then go back and "cut" the garbage characters.
>>
>> And why should I have to make links? With Resharper if I want to
>> rename something, no matter how great or small the scope, it's just a
>> shift+f6 away.
>>
>> It might just be my opinion, but CodeRush tries to be a
>> jack-of-all-trades and ends up a master of none. Resharper doesn't
>> claim to do as much, but what it does is really effective, and just
>> helps me write better code faster.
>>


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Hello Valentin,

VK> By the way, in ReSharper 2.0 we changed shortcut for Rename to F2
VK> (which seems to be more logical).

I agree, although it might be nice with ReSharper 2.0 to be able to choose
between applying the key shorcut mapping of either 1.5 or the new 2.0.

I wonder, the key mapping could also be in a configuration file for backup
or exchange purposes. Well, maybe I'm taking this a bit too far. I wouldn't
want to bloat ReSharper either.

I'm sure I'll be using the new key mapping anyway 8)


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Hello Jean-Francois,

In VS 2005 Microsoft has added an option to import/export various settings
(keyboard mappings including)
into a file, so it is much easier than it was in VS 2003. I think future
ReSharper 2.0 users will benefit from this
VS feature.

Regards,
Dmitry Shaporenkov
JetBrains, Inc
http://www.jetbrains.com
"Develop with pleasure!"

Hello Valentin,

VK>> By the way, in ReSharper 2.0 we changed shortcut for Rename to F2
VK>> (which seems to be more logical).
VK>>

I agree, although it might be nice with ReSharper 2.0 to be able to
choose between applying the key shorcut mapping of either 1.5 or the
new 2.0.

I wonder, the key mapping could also be in a configuration file for
backup or exchange purposes. Well, maybe I'm taking this a bit too
far. I wouldn't want to bloat ReSharper either.

I'm sure I'll be using the new key mapping anyway 8)



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I agree, although it might be nice with ReSharper 2.0 to be able to
choose between applying the key shorcut mapping of either 1.5 or the
new 2.0.


There will be not many changes. Currently there are 2 differences: Rename
is F2 instead of Shift-F6 and Go to Next/Prev Error is changed to F12/Shift-F12
instead of F2/Shift-F2.

Valentin Kipiatkov
Chief Scientist, Vice President of Product Development
JetBrains, Inc
http://www.jetbrains.com
"Develop with pleasure!"

Hello Valentin,

VK>> By the way, in ReSharper 2.0 we changed shortcut for Rename to F2
VK>> (which seems to be more logical).
VK>>

I agree, although it might be nice with ReSharper 2.0 to be able to
choose between applying the key shorcut mapping of either 1.5 or the
new 2.0.

I wonder, the key mapping could also be in a configuration file for
backup or exchange purposes. Well, maybe I'm taking this a bit too
far. I wouldn't want to bloat ReSharper either.

I'm sure I'll be using the new key mapping anyway 8)



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