What's the benefit of using Resharper? Most of the features duplicate what's already in VS

Hello,

This is a serious question, not an attempt to be rude or start an argument. I came to look at R# as I had heard good reports about it, and wanted to see if it was worth buying.

I've spent a fair amount of time looking through the features, and the vast majority of them seem to duplicate things that are already in VS2010. If so, what's the point of spending money on an external tool, that provides the same functionality, and requires me to learn a whole new set of keyboard shortcuts (which annoyingly conflict with ones already in use).

I'm sure I must have missed something, but even after spending quite a long time reading the features list in detail, I didn't see very much that seemed to justify the reputation.

Please enlighten me. If it really is a good tool, I want to know. If it's not, I also want to know!

Thanks

4 comments

ReSharper is great tool, man!
Yes, VS provides some refactorings, but it is only 1/10 or lesser than you can receive from R#.
Refactorings are easy-to-use with R#. Forgot VS shortcuts!
Besides, you probably forgot about such cool feature as code analysis - R# hints warnings, possible improvements ( for example, convert foreach to LINQ) in your code - and you can also define your own patterns with pattern catalog.
Also very useful thing - solution wide analysis. You don't need to compile solution to see compile-time errors.
You can use live templates to write code faster - for example, I have to press only 2 keys to write:

        public void NewMethod()         {                      }

Also R# detects some magic strings - for example, ASP.NET MVC view names, actions and controllers. And you can use code navigation in views!
ReSharper is tool that must have every professional software developer!
I'll write code 5-10 times slower without R#. R# saves your time

0

I agree.

R# has a ton of functionality that VS lacks

Naming convention checking helps you in projects that you share with others

The code review helps you write more stable code (possible NullReferenceException) and compacter and more readable code.

The refactoring functionality is much more than what VS has to offer. They have narrowed the gap a bit, but don't even come close to what R# can.

Code completion and many templates help you write code faster and with less errors.

You earn the money of the licence back in a few months becaus of the timesavings.

0

Hello,

Thank you for your interest in ReSharper! Actually there are a lot of features
in ReSharer that are missing in Visual Studio. Please take a look at the
following document that compares the features of Visual Studio 2010 and ReSharper
5: http://www.jetbrains.com/resharper/docs/ReSharper50vsVisualStudio2010Comparison.pdf.
Let me know if this helps.

Andrey Serebryansky
Senior Support Engineer
JetBrains, Inc
http://www.jetbrains.com
"Develop with pleasure!"

Hello,

This is a serious question, not an attempt to be rude or start an
argument. I came to look at R# as I had heard good reports about it,
and wanted to see if it was worth buying.

I've spent a fair amount of time looking through the features, and the
vast majority of them seem to duplicate things that are already in
VS2010. If so, what's the point of spending money on an external tool,
that provides the same functionality, and requires me to learn a whole
new set of keyboard shortcuts (which annoyingly conflict with ones
already in use).

I'm sure I must have missed something, but even after spending quite a
long time reading the features list in detail, I didn't see very much
that seemed to justify the reputation.

Please enlighten me. If it really is a good tool, I want to know. If
it's not, I also want to know!

Thanks

---
Original message URL:
http://devnet.jetbrains.net/message/5281241#5281241



0

Having come from a Java background and used IntelliJ Idea and Eclipse, i've been used to having access to a lot more than the extremely basic functionality in visual studio (by comparison anyway).  R# fills that gap and really supercharges Visual Studio up to where i've been used to in the Java environments in my opinion.

You get a number of different kinds of benefits with R#, some of the ones i've played with so far (i'm only evaluating it myself at the moment but I strongly suspect i'll be purchasing it once the eval period is over):

1. Static code analysis
- This is like LINT in the C world, or CheckStyle/PMD in Java, it will give you loads of style hints, tell you where you're not using C# efficiently, or where you're using it confusingly. It even shows up much of this analysis directly in he code, highlighting unused variables in grey and unknown things in red, showing redundant code directly in your editor and so forth.  Static analysis helps keep the standard of your code up, stops you making silly mistakes and is generally a must-have.  VS has nothing like this (out of the box anyway).  One of the really neat things with the static analysis in Resharper is that it not only says what it thinks is wrong, it gives you a button to auto-fix it to a recommended solution (you can fix it manually of course if you disagree with the option(s) proposed).  This then means that the static analysis is a really great learning tool, you write code one way and resharper comes along and says "you do realise you can do all this in a one liner like this now don't you?" :)  It's like having a C# guru sitting next to you all the time.

2. Enhanced tools
- For example, the call reference analyser is much better than the one that comes with it (i.e. the view call hierarchy), I found it much more comprehensive.

3. Refactoring
- VS comes with refactoring tools but they're relatively basic, resharper adds a bunch of extra and more comprehensive ones.   This is heavily used by the static code analysis as well.

I've not really used a lot of its features yet - those are the ones i'm making most use of right now and they've already sold the product for me.  I'm sure as I get to using other features it will just reinforce that opinion.

Matt.

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