Just curious...

I am an IDEA user but I doubt I'll ever use C#/.NET and therefore
ReSharper. (I don't have a Windows computer, and while I've heard that
you can use C# on other platforms, I'm not sure if there's much reason,
and besides it looks like ReSharper is only for Windows.)

But I have a few questions about ReSharper, out of pure curiosity:


I assume it's written in C#, right?

Assuming it's written in C#, do you use any of the Java code from IDEA,
either calling Java from C#, somehow converting Java to C#, or having
tests written in Java but implementation written in C#? Or did you just
start over from scratch (having a lot of knowledge gained from writing
IDEA of course).

Again assuming it's written in C#, do you find it easier to write
end-user GUI applications in C#/.NET than in Java?

If you were to write a complex desktop application like IDEA again (but
not an IDE), would you implement it in Java (and therefore get the
cross-platformess for free (not really for free of course)), or would
you use something more native like C#/.NET or something even more native
like whatever Windows programs are normally written in (C++/MFC or
whatever)?


Just curious...

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I assume it's written in C#, right?


Yes, of course.

>

Assuming it's written in C#, do you use any of the Java code from IDEA,
either calling Java from C#, somehow converting Java to C#, or having
tests written in Java but implementation written in C#? Or did you just
start over from scratch (having a lot of knowledge gained from writing
IDEA of course).


We have written it from the scratch.

>

Again assuming it's written in C#, do you find it easier to write
end-user GUI applications in C#/.NET than in Java?


It's difficult to say that in the moment. ReSharper is a plugin and has not
much UI currently. However we are developing another desktop product using
C# now (you'll be able to test it soon).
In general the desktop UI framework provided by .NET (WinForms) has some
shortcomings at the moment (especially with performance). However I'm sure
that MS will fix it eventually.

>

If you were to write a complex desktop application like IDEA again (but
not an IDE), would you implement it in Java (and therefore get the
cross-platformess for free (not really for free of course)), or would
you use something more native like C#/.NET or something even more native
like whatever Windows programs are normally written in (C++/MFC or
whatever)?


I would use Java only if the cross-platformness is an important issue.
I would not use C++/MFC, C#/.NET is more efficient to use IMO.

--
Valentin Kipiatkov
Chief Scientist, Vice President of Product Development
JetBrains, Inc
http://www.jetbrains.com
"Develop with pleasure!"


"Erik Hanson" <ehanson-lists@eh.cdeh.org> wrote in message
news:ehanson-lists-CCB446.13211315022004@host98.intellij.net...

I am an IDEA user but I doubt I'll ever use C#/.NET and therefore
ReSharper. (I don't have a Windows computer, and while I've heard that
you can use C# on other platforms, I'm not sure if there's much reason,
and besides it looks like ReSharper is only for Windows.)

>

But I have a few questions about ReSharper, out of pure curiosity:

>
>

I assume it's written in C#, right?

>

Assuming it's written in C#, do you use any of the Java code from IDEA,
either calling Java from C#, somehow converting Java to C#, or having
tests written in Java but implementation written in C#? Or did you just
start over from scratch (having a lot of knowledge gained from writing
IDEA of course).

>

Again assuming it's written in C#, do you find it easier to write
end-user GUI applications in C#/.NET than in Java?

>

If you were to write a complex desktop application like IDEA again (but
not an IDE), would you implement it in Java (and therefore get the
cross-platformess for free (not really for free of course)), or would
you use something more native like C#/.NET or something even more native
like whatever Windows programs are normally written in (C++/MFC or
whatever)?

>
>

Just curious...



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