VS.Net 2005?

I'm pretty happy with my evaluation of ReSharper. And, we will probably be using VS.Net 2003 for a short while after the release of VS.Net 2005. But, ultimately, we will be upgrading and ReSharper's refactoring will lose value for us.

I assume you are planning to integrate with VS.Net 2005 - can you share anything that would increase the value of ReSharper for us going forward? I would hate to purchase it now and find that I can't use it effectively in another 6 months.

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Hello Charles,

I'm pretty happy with my evaluation of ReSharper. And, we will
probably be using VS.Net 2003 for a short while after the release of
VS.Net 2005. But, ultimately, we will be upgrading and ReSharper's
refactoring will lose value for us.

I assume you are planning to integrate with VS.Net 2005 - can you
share anything that would increase the value of ReSharper for us going
forward? I would hate to purchase it now and find that I can't use it
effectively in another 6 months.



Thanks for the email and the good question -- We're happy to announce that we WILL be supporting VS .NET 2005. We plan on launching ReSharper for VS .NET 2005 a month or so after VS .NET 2005 comes out.

As for value -- if you purchase ReSharper NOW, you'll get at least 6 months of more productivity which will quickly justifies ReSharper's low cost. Addtional value will come when upgrading to ReSharper for VS .NET 2005 -- as it will be discounted, at minimum, for current ReSharper users. However, the pricing/upgrades policy for ReSharper for VS .NET 2005 hasn't been worked out -- so I can't give you specifics ... but it will be in our customers' best interest (ie... they'll be happy to upgrade). Current IntelliJ IDEA customers upgrade for like 40% of the normal price, so I'm guessing that ReSharper upgrades for VS .NET 2005 will follow a similar path, in the least.

Does that help answer your question?

All the best,

David
JetBrains, Inc.
"Develop with pleasure!"




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It answers part of my question. And I probably should have been a bit more specific.

What, if anything, can you tell me about how the upgrade will go one better on Microsoft in terms of refactoring, code completion, and other features currently in ReSharper. VS.Net will be supporting refactoring, so that is major piece of ReSharper's advantage at this point.

I know that there are some features in the current version of ReSharper that I have yet to fully explore - so there are probably other advantages right now. However, the most visible and biggest selling point for me is the refactoring.

Thanks.

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To build on what chaz is saying, one of the biggest gains for me is reshaper's superb intellisense support, but C# in VS.Net 2005 has as good (if not better) intellisense support than C# w/vs.net 2003 + reshaper.

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Hello Charles,

It answers part of my question. And I probably should have been a bit
more specific.

What, if anything, can you tell me about how the upgrade will go one
better on Microsoft in terms of refactoring, code completion, and
other features currently in ReSharper. VS.Net will be supporting
refactoring, so that is major piece of ReSharper's advantage at this
point.

I know that there are some features in the current version of
ReSharper that I have yet to fully explore - so there are probably
other advantages right now. However, the most visible and biggest
selling point for me is the refactoring.

Thanks.


Well, as I understand it -- ReSharper has about 20 "big" features as of now -- about 10 (1/2) will be in VS .NET 2005 -- that means at minimum, ReSharper will have 10 other features that VS. NET 2005 won't have -- but of couse, we're JetBrains :P -- so we'll have MORE features to add I'm sure (but again, I'm just speculating at this time -- I'm not part of the development team but this is probably on the immediate agenda of the ReSharper team). You'll just have to stay tuned I guess -- as things begin to form, we'll announce our intentions.

As for refactorings. has VS. NET 2005 announced a full list of refactorings to come? Whatever the case, one of our forte's in our Java development tool is refactorings -- we lead the industry in refactorings -- JetBrains is going to carry the torch into the C# world, too -- you can bet on it -- so, within time, regardless of what Microsoft does, we're going to out do them when it comes to refactorings and intelligence ... again, this is just me boasting (and spectulating), but ReSharper for VS .NET 2005 is going to be worth upgrading to .... otherwise, we wouldn't waste our customers' time (or ours) if we weren't going to give any additional added value to what already will exist for people on the .NET platform.

And as I noted previously -- VS .NET 2005 isn't scheduled until the new year? That's 5 months away basically -- so, for 5 months you'll be a lot more productive with ReSharper NOW than you would be without it, making the cost of ReSharper negligible.... couple that the fact that upgrades for ReSharper for VS .NET 2005 will be highly discounted (at the least) for current ReSharper customers, it's a win-win situtation for you.

Hope that helps ...

Best,

David
JetBrains, Inc.
"Develop with pleasure!"



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Hello karl,

To build on what chaz is saying, one of the biggest gains for me is
reshaper's superb intellisense support, but C# in VS.Net 2005 has as
good (if not better) intellisense support than C# w/vs.net 2003 +
reshaper.


I'm sure VS .NET 2005 will have some cool features (they have, what, 5 more months to garner ideas from before release?) ... but since we're now going to support ReSharper for VS .NET 2005, you can be assured that we'll bring some extra added value to VS .NET 2005 as we are doing now to VS .NET 2003 -- all the more reason to start using ReSharper now (so you can get benefits now) ... and of course, as we have traditionally, we'll bring some cooler features to VS .NET 2005 once we launch ReSharper for that platform. ;) It's the JetBrains way. :-P

In the meantime, if you have any specific complaints or recommendations for ReSharper for VS .NET 2005 (things you'd like to see), be sure to get that info into our ReSharper newsgroups for consideration ...

All the best,

David
JetBrains, Inc.
"Develop with pleasure!"

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I personally think that refactoring IS NOT the biggest feature of ReSharper. Not that ReSharper's refactoring is not good but I think it's less than a half of ReSharper's "added value". There is a lot of other features and it's the matter of personal preference and working style which features are the best. For example, live error highlighting + quickfixes is a very helpful thing for me.

--
Valentin Kipiatkov
Chief Scientist, Vice President of Product Development
JetBrains, Inc
http://www.jetbrains.com "Develop with pleasure!"


It answers part of my question. And I probably should have been a bit
more specific.

What, if anything, can you tell me about how the upgrade will go one
better on Microsoft in terms of refactoring, code completion, and
other features currently in ReSharper. VS.Net will be supporting
refactoring, so that is major piece of ReSharper's advantage at this
point.

I know that there are some features in the current version of
ReSharper that I have yet to fully explore - so there are probably
other advantages right now. However, the most visible and biggest
selling point for me is the refactoring.

Thanks.


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I agree. Refactoring is "OK" in R#, and it fills most my needs (95% of the
time I only use Rename and Extract). If I wanted a refactoring tool I would
have stayed with C# Refactory
(http://www.xtreme-simplicity.net/CSharpRefactory.html), as it has a couple
more Refactorings.

But the quickfixes ( like importing namespaces), enhanced intelisense (
CTRLSHIFTSPACE to find any class referenced) and the error reporting are
what makes me cry when I don't have R#.


Cheers,
Paulo


"Valentin Kipiatkov" <valentin@intellij.com> wrote in message
news:cfcqnp$cae$1@is.intellij.net...

I personally think that refactoring IS NOT the biggest feature of

ReSharper. Not that ReSharper's refactoring is not good but I think it's
less than a half of ReSharper's "added value". There is a lot of other
features and it's the matter of personal preference and working style which
features are the best. For example, live error highlighting + quickfixes is
a very helpful thing for me.
>

--
Valentin Kipiatkov
Chief Scientist, Vice President of Product Development
JetBrains, Inc
http://www.jetbrains.com "Develop with pleasure!"

>
>
>

It answers part of my question. And I probably should have been a bit
more specific.

>

What, if anything, can you tell me about how the upgrade will go one
better on Microsoft in terms of refactoring, code completion, and
other features currently in ReSharper. VS.Net will be supporting
refactoring, so that is major piece of ReSharper's advantage at this
point.

>

I know that there are some features in the current version of
ReSharper that I have yet to fully explore - so there are probably
other advantages right now. However, the most visible and biggest
selling point for me is the refactoring.

>

Thanks.

>

>


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But the quickfixes ( like importing namespaces),
enhanced intelisense (CTRLSHIFTSPACE to find any
class referenced) and the error reporting are
what makes me cry when I don't have R#.


Since we're discussing VS.Net 2005, I'd like to point out that those quickfixes and immediate error reporting are already in the beta.

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What do you mean by "immediate error reporting"? We don't see any reasonable error highlighting in Beta 1.

--
Oleg Stepanov
Software Developer
JetBrains, Inc
http://www.jetbrains.com
"Develop with pleasure!"

>> But the quickfixes ( like importing namespaces),
>> enhanced intelisense (CTRLSHIFTSPACE to find any
>> class referenced) and the error reporting are
>> what makes me cry when I don't have R#.

Since we're discussing VS.Net 2005, I'd like to point out that those
quickfixes and immediate error reporting are already in the beta.


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It's not very thorough, but being a beta, I imagine it's going to get more comprehensive by the time it's released. But create a new class (I created a new console application) and type an opening brace "{" inside a method. Wait about a second, and you'll see:

Error List
Description
x 1 } expected

And it does put little curly red underlines under the error. (Although in this example the underline isn't in the best spot)

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This kind of error highlighting was present in VS.NET from the very
beginning. We do not see any improvements to it in 2005 Beta. At least,
things that ReSharper does, like highlighting of the unresolved identifiers,
are out of VS.NET 2005.

--
Andrey Simanovsky
Software Developer
JetBrains, Inc
http://www.jetbrains.com
"Develop with pleasure!"



"Kirk Woll" <kirk@digimax.com> wrote in message
news:3641230.1092677772205.JavaMail.itn@is.intellij.net...

It's not very thorough, but being a beta, I imagine it's going to get more

comprehensive by the time it's released. But create a new class (I created
a new console application) and type an opening brace "{" inside a method.
Wait about a second, and you'll see:
>

Error List
Description
x 1 } expected

>

And it does put little curly red underlines under the error. (Although in

this example the underline isn't in the best spot)


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Hmm, I didn't notice that in the previous version but yes, it's very limited and if it's not a new feature then you're probably right that it won't see any improvement.

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