I just have to say...

My team recently migrated from VS2003 to VS2005 ... exclusively. This means
we all had to leave ReSharper behind.

Several members of the team looked at the specs for VS2005 and decided they
probably didn't need ReSharper, after all, it had refactoring, and "code
snippets" (like Live Templates), etc, etc.

Well, having been forced to use VS2005 without ReSharper (the EAP version
isn't stable enough to use for our projects yet, though I do test all new
builds before reverting back to "plain" VS2005), I have to say...
Microsoft's versions of ReSharper features are really, really awful.

A perfect example is the "foreach" code snippet. It takes me longer to use
that code snippet than it does to just type out the whole loop by hand. And
create a new one? You mean, I have to hand-code an XML file?!? UGH!
Never mind that even simple rename refactorings take too long and have many
times completely screwed up (behaving more like a global search and replace
than a true rename refactoring). And just the absence of any equivalent to
Ctrl-N (Go To Class) is enough to drive me mad.

Several of the people who originally said they could probably live without
ReSharper have now done a 180 after only a week with VS2005. I am really,
really hoping that ReSharper 2.0 gets stable enough to start using SOON. In
fact, I hope JetBrains just stops trying to add new features and new bells
and whistles, and just concentrates on fixing all the exceptions and
performance issues, so I can stop developing with pain and frustration, and
start Developing With Pleasure again!



22 comments
Comment actions Permalink

Hear, hear!

We're waiting for a good build of R# for VS2005 before we move to it. Can't
afford the productivity loss!


"Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
news:dsg8ck$pbi$1@is.intellij.net...

My team recently migrated from VS2003 to VS2005 ... exclusively. This
means we all had to leave ReSharper behind.

>

Several members of the team looked at the specs for VS2005 and decided
they probably didn't need ReSharper, after all, it had refactoring, and
"code snippets" (like Live Templates), etc, etc.

>

Well, having been forced to use VS2005 without ReSharper (the EAP version
isn't stable enough to use for our projects yet, though I do test all new
builds before reverting back to "plain" VS2005), I have to say...
Microsoft's versions of ReSharper features are really, really awful.

>

A perfect example is the "foreach" code snippet. It takes me longer to
use that code snippet than it does to just type out the whole loop by
hand. And create a new one? You mean, I have to hand-code an XML file?!?
UGH! Never mind that even simple rename refactorings take too long and
have many times completely screwed up (behaving more like a global search
and replace than a true rename refactoring). And just the absence of any
equivalent to Ctrl-N (Go To Class) is enough to drive me mad.

>

Several of the people who originally said they could probably live without
ReSharper have now done a 180 after only a week with VS2005. I am really,
really hoping that ReSharper 2.0 gets stable enough to start using SOON.
In fact, I hope JetBrains just stops trying to add new features and new
bells and whistles, and just concentrates on fixing all the exceptions and
performance issues, so I can stop developing with pain and frustration,
and start Developing With Pleasure again!

>
>



0
Comment actions Permalink

The stability of R# depends on kind of project you are working on. If it
Class library it is very useful.
For ASP.NET was very good.
I really think one of you should try each new build and see if he fills that
he is working faster. If so he can pass the information to rest of the team.
This decision needs about 2-3 hours of work.
Even if you read this news group you can see that experiences are quiet
different from user to user.
Good luck.
Shimon.
"Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
news:dsg8ck$pbi$1@is.intellij.net...

My team recently migrated from VS2003 to VS2005 ... exclusively. This
means we all had to leave ReSharper behind.

>

Several members of the team looked at the specs for VS2005 and decided
they probably didn't need ReSharper, after all, it had refactoring, and
"code snippets" (like Live Templates), etc, etc.

>

Well, having been forced to use VS2005 without ReSharper (the EAP version
isn't stable enough to use for our projects yet, though I do test all new
builds before reverting back to "plain" VS2005), I have to say...
Microsoft's versions of ReSharper features are really, really awful.

>

A perfect example is the "foreach" code snippet. It takes me longer to
use that code snippet than it does to just type out the whole loop by
hand. And create a new one? You mean, I have to hand-code an XML file?!?
UGH! Never mind that even simple rename refactorings take too long and
have many times completely screwed up (behaving more like a global search
and replace than a true rename refactoring). And just the absence of any
equivalent to Ctrl-N (Go To Class) is enough to drive me mad.

>

Several of the people who originally said they could probably live without
ReSharper have now done a 180 after only a week with VS2005. I am really,
really hoping that ReSharper 2.0 gets stable enough to start using SOON.
In fact, I hope JetBrains just stops trying to add new features and new
bells and whistles, and just concentrates on fixing all the exceptions and
performance issues, so I can stop developing with pain and frustration,
and start Developing With Pleasure again!

>
>



0
Comment actions Permalink

We have a very large application with websites and ASP.NET pages, controls,
libraries, and the works.

I try new builds, but so far none have been usable... the latest builds are
completely unusable. I have checked it out on a simple solution with one
winforms project, and it works well there, and it just reminds me how much I
miss it. I can't wait until I can load up our projects into it without
experiencing infinite exceptions, 50-100% CPU usage, etc. I'm the "point
man" on our team for Resharper, and trust me, the MOMENT there's a
stable-enough build, I'll switch to using it full time. I just wish that
time were sooner rather than later (preferably two weeks ago!), but I guess
I'll just have to be patient :)


"Shimon Sim" <shimonsim048@community.nospam> wrote in message
news:dsga85$qn$1@is.intellij.net...

The stability of R# depends on kind of project you are working on. If it
Class library it is very useful.
For ASP.NET was very good.
I really think one of you should try each new build and see if he fills
that he is working faster. If so he can pass the information to rest of
the team.
This decision needs about 2-3 hours of work.
Even if you read this news group you can see that experiences are quiet
different from user to user.
Good luck.
Shimon.
"Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
news:dsg8ck$pbi$1@is.intellij.net...

>> My team recently migrated from VS2003 to VS2005 ... exclusively. This
>> means we all had to leave ReSharper behind.
>>
>> Several members of the team looked at the specs for VS2005 and decided
>> they probably didn't need ReSharper, after all, it had refactoring, and
>> "code snippets" (like Live Templates), etc, etc.
>>
>> Well, having been forced to use VS2005 without ReSharper (the EAP version
>> isn't stable enough to use for our projects yet, though I do test all new
>> builds before reverting back to "plain" VS2005), I have to say...
>> Microsoft's versions of ReSharper features are really, really awful.
>>
>> A perfect example is the "foreach" code snippet. It takes me longer to
>> use that code snippet than it does to just type out the whole loop by
>> hand. And create a new one? You mean, I have to hand-code an XML
>> file?!? UGH! Never mind that even simple rename refactorings take too
>> long and have many times completely screwed up (behaving more like a
>> global search and replace than a true rename refactoring). And just the
>> absence of any equivalent to Ctrl-N (Go To Class) is enough to drive me
>> mad.
>>
>> Several of the people who originally said they could probably live
>> without ReSharper have now done a 180 after only a week with VS2005. I
>> am really, really hoping that ReSharper 2.0 gets stable enough to start
>> using SOON. In fact, I hope JetBrains just stops trying to add new
>> features and new bells and whistles, and just concentrates on fixing all
>> the exceptions and performance issues, so I can stop developing with pain
>> and frustration, and start Developing With Pleasure again!
>>
>>
>>
>



0
Comment actions Permalink

My project is pretty huge too, I have been messing with resharper from 201
till 213 (215 for a while). I have the same issues that force me to go back
to 165 until something stable comes up. Agreed the features until 213 are
stable but the memory requirements are bad and I often end up getting
OutOfMemoryException after working for a short time.

I think though 165 is pretty limited it is my only option rather than losing
productivity until something stable comes along.

-Arun


"Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
news:dsgd5l$jma$1@is.intellij.net...

We have a very large application with websites and ASP.NET pages,
controls, libraries, and the works.

>

I try new builds, but so far none have been usable... the latest builds
are completely unusable. I have checked it out on a simple solution with
one winforms project, and it works well there, and it just reminds me how
much I miss it. I can't wait until I can load up our projects into it
without experiencing infinite exceptions, 50-100% CPU usage, etc. I'm the
"point man" on our team for Resharper, and trust me, the MOMENT there's a
stable-enough build, I'll switch to using it full time. I just wish that
time were sooner rather than later (preferably two weeks ago!), but I
guess I'll just have to be patient :)

>
>

"Shimon Sim" <shimonsim048@community.nospam> wrote in message
news:dsga85$qn$1@is.intellij.net...

>> The stability of R# depends on kind of project you are working on. If it
>> Class library it is very useful.
>> For ASP.NET was very good.
>> I really think one of you should try each new build and see if he fills
>> that he is working faster. If so he can pass the information to rest of
>> the team.
>> This decision needs about 2-3 hours of work.
>> Even if you read this news group you can see that experiences are quiet
>> different from user to user.
>> Good luck.
>> Shimon.
>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>> news:dsg8ck$pbi$1@is.intellij.net...
>>> My team recently migrated from VS2003 to VS2005 ... exclusively. This
>>> means we all had to leave ReSharper behind.
>>>
>>> Several members of the team looked at the specs for VS2005 and decided
>>> they probably didn't need ReSharper, after all, it had refactoring, and
>>> "code snippets" (like Live Templates), etc, etc.
>>>
>>> Well, having been forced to use VS2005 without ReSharper (the EAP
>>> version isn't stable enough to use for our projects yet, though I do
>>> test all new builds before reverting back to "plain" VS2005), I have to
>>> say... Microsoft's versions of ReSharper features are really, really
>>> awful.
>>>
>>> A perfect example is the "foreach" code snippet. It takes me longer to
>>> use that code snippet than it does to just type out the whole loop by
>>> hand. And create a new one? You mean, I have to hand-code an XML
>>> file?!? UGH! Never mind that even simple rename refactorings take too
>>> long and have many times completely screwed up (behaving more like a
>>> global search and replace than a true rename refactoring). And just the
>>> absence of any equivalent to Ctrl-N (Go To Class) is enough to drive me
>>> mad.
>>>
>>> Several of the people who originally said they could probably live
>>> without ReSharper have now done a 180 after only a week with VS2005. I
>>> am really, really hoping that ReSharper 2.0 gets stable enough to start
>>> using SOON. In fact, I hope JetBrains just stops trying to add new
>>> features and new bells and whistles, and just concentrates on fixing all
>>> the exceptions and performance issues, so I can stop developing with
>>> pain and frustration, and start Developing With Pleasure again!
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>



0
Comment actions Permalink

Our project here is huge (3000+ classes) and 213's memory requirements means
we get OutOfMemoryException every now and then. More often than we like :)

But 215 and 216 are really good.

Arun wrote:

My project is pretty huge too, I have been messing with resharper from 201
till 213 (215 for a while). I have the same issues that force me to go back
to 165 until something stable comes up. Agreed the features until 213 are
stable but the memory requirements are bad and I often end up getting
OutOfMemoryException after working for a short time.

I think though 165 is pretty limited it is my only option rather than losing
productivity until something stable comes along.

-Arun


"Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
news:dsgd5l$jma$1@is.intellij.net...

>> We have a very large application with websites and ASP.NET pages,
>> controls, libraries, and the works.
>>
>> I try new builds, but so far none have been usable... the latest builds
>> are completely unusable. I have checked it out on a simple solution with
>> one winforms project, and it works well there, and it just reminds me how
>> much I miss it. I can't wait until I can load up our projects into it
>> without experiencing infinite exceptions, 50-100% CPU usage, etc. I'm the
>> "point man" on our team for Resharper, and trust me, the MOMENT there's a
>> stable-enough build, I'll switch to using it full time. I just wish that
>> time were sooner rather than later (preferably two weeks ago!), but I
>> guess I'll just have to be patient :)
>>
>>
>> "Shimon Sim" <shimonsim048@community.nospam> wrote in message
>> news:dsga85$qn$1@is.intellij.net...
>>> The stability of R# depends on kind of project you are working on. If it
>>> Class library it is very useful.
>>> For ASP.NET was very good.
>>> I really think one of you should try each new build and see if he fills
>>> that he is working faster. If so he can pass the information to rest of
>>> the team.
>>> This decision needs about 2-3 hours of work.
>>> Even if you read this news group you can see that experiences are quiet
>>> different from user to user.
>>> Good luck.
>>> Shimon.
>>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>>> news:dsg8ck$pbi$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>> My team recently migrated from VS2003 to VS2005 ... exclusively. This
>>>> means we all had to leave ReSharper behind.
>>>>
>>>> Several members of the team looked at the specs for VS2005 and decided
>>>> they probably didn't need ReSharper, after all, it had refactoring, and
>>>> "code snippets" (like Live Templates), etc, etc.
>>>>
>>>> Well, having been forced to use VS2005 without ReSharper (the EAP
>>>> version isn't stable enough to use for our projects yet, though I do
>>>> test all new builds before reverting back to "plain" VS2005), I have to
>>>> say... Microsoft's versions of ReSharper features are really, really
>>>> awful.
>>>>
>>>> A perfect example is the "foreach" code snippet. It takes me longer to
>>>> use that code snippet than it does to just type out the whole loop by
>>>> hand. And create a new one? You mean, I have to hand-code an XML
>>>> file?!? UGH! Never mind that even simple rename refactorings take too
>>>> long and have many times completely screwed up (behaving more like a
>>>> global search and replace than a true rename refactoring). And just the
>>>> absence of any equivalent to Ctrl-N (Go To Class) is enough to drive me
>>>> mad.
>>>>
>>>> Several of the people who originally said they could probably live
>>>> without ReSharper have now done a 180 after only a week with VS2005. I
>>>> am really, really hoping that ReSharper 2.0 gets stable enough to start
>>>> using SOON. In fact, I hope JetBrains just stops trying to add new
>>>> features and new bells and whistles, and just concentrates on fixing all
>>>> the exceptions and performance issues, so I can stop developing with
>>>> pain and frustration, and start Developing With Pleasure again!
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>


0
Comment actions Permalink

I wish I had the option of going back to 165, but we're on VS2005
exclusively now (large group of developers sharing project files) and so I'm
stuck with bare-naked VS2005, and boy is it annoying.

I'm keeping my fingers crossed that build 218 (whever it comes out) is "good
enough" to actually keep it installed and use it.

"Arun" <akeserla@aristocrat-inc.com> wrote in message
news:dsgf9i$sc0$1@is.intellij.net...

My project is pretty huge too, I have been messing with resharper from 201
till 213 (215 for a while). I have the same issues that force me to go
back to 165 until something stable comes up. Agreed the features until 213
are stable but the memory requirements are bad and I often end up getting
OutOfMemoryException after working for a short time.

>

I think though 165 is pretty limited it is my only option rather than
losing productivity until something stable comes along.

>

-Arun

>
>

"Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
news:dsgd5l$jma$1@is.intellij.net...

>> We have a very large application with websites and ASP.NET pages,
>> controls, libraries, and the works.
>>
>> I try new builds, but so far none have been usable... the latest builds
>> are completely unusable. I have checked it out on a simple solution with
>> one winforms project, and it works well there, and it just reminds me how
>> much I miss it. I can't wait until I can load up our projects into it
>> without experiencing infinite exceptions, 50-100% CPU usage, etc. I'm
>> the "point man" on our team for Resharper, and trust me, the MOMENT
>> there's a stable-enough build, I'll switch to using it full time. I just
>> wish that time were sooner rather than later (preferably two weeks ago!),
>> but I guess I'll just have to be patient :)
>>
>>
>> "Shimon Sim" <shimonsim048@community.nospam> wrote in message
>> news:dsga85$qn$1@is.intellij.net...
>>> The stability of R# depends on kind of project you are working on. If it
>>> Class library it is very useful.
>>> For ASP.NET was very good.
>>> I really think one of you should try each new build and see if he fills
>>> that he is working faster. If so he can pass the information to rest of
>>> the team.
>>> This decision needs about 2-3 hours of work.
>>> Even if you read this news group you can see that experiences are quiet
>>> different from user to user.
>>> Good luck.
>>> Shimon.
>>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>>> news:dsg8ck$pbi$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>> My team recently migrated from VS2003 to VS2005 ... exclusively. This
>>>> means we all had to leave ReSharper behind.
>>>>
>>>> Several members of the team looked at the specs for VS2005 and decided
>>>> they probably didn't need ReSharper, after all, it had refactoring, and
>>>> "code snippets" (like Live Templates), etc, etc.
>>>>
>>>> Well, having been forced to use VS2005 without ReSharper (the EAP
>>>> version isn't stable enough to use for our projects yet, though I do
>>>> test all new builds before reverting back to "plain" VS2005), I have to
>>>> say... Microsoft's versions of ReSharper features are really, really
>>>> awful.
>>>>
>>>> A perfect example is the "foreach" code snippet. It takes me longer to
>>>> use that code snippet than it does to just type out the whole loop by
>>>> hand. And create a new one? You mean, I have to hand-code an XML
>>>> file?!? UGH! Never mind that even simple rename refactorings take too
>>>> long and have many times completely screwed up (behaving more like a
>>>> global search and replace than a true rename refactoring). And just
>>>> the absence of any equivalent to Ctrl-N (Go To Class) is enough to
>>>> drive me mad.
>>>>
>>>> Several of the people who originally said they could probably live
>>>> without ReSharper have now done a 180 after only a week with VS2005. I
>>>> am really, really hoping that ReSharper 2.0 gets stable enough to start
>>>> using SOON. In fact, I hope JetBrains just stops trying to add new
>>>> features and new bells and whistles, and just concentrates on fixing
>>>> all the exceptions and performance issues, so I can stop developing
>>>> with pain and frustration, and start Developing With Pleasure again!
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>



0
Comment actions Permalink

Paul:

You did mention your favorite keystoke CNTL-N (& I am guessing SHFT-CNTL-N).
I use the command window which makes it a breeze to open a filename (not
sure about class).

I sometimes use CNTL-ALT-A & "open ". This helps me a lot as my project is pretty huge. -Arun "Paul Bradshaw" wrote in message news:dsgmsg$qdq$1@is.intellij.net... >I wish I had the option of going back to 165, but we're on VS2005 >exclusively now (large group of developers sharing project files) and so >I'm stuck with bare-naked VS2005, and boy is it annoying. >]]>

I'm keeping my fingers crossed that build 218 (whever it comes out) is
"good enough" to actually keep it installed and use it.

>

"Arun" <akeserla@aristocrat-inc.com> wrote in message
news:dsgf9i$sc0$1@is.intellij.net...

>> My project is pretty huge too, I have been messing with resharper from
>> 201 till 213 (215 for a while). I have the same issues that force me to
>> go back to 165 until something stable comes up. Agreed the features until
>> 213 are stable but the memory requirements are bad and I often end up
>> getting OutOfMemoryException after working for a short time.
>>
>> I think though 165 is pretty limited it is my only option rather than
>> losing productivity until something stable comes along.
>>
>> -Arun
>>
>>
>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>> news:dsgd5l$jma$1@is.intellij.net...
>>> We have a very large application with websites and ASP.NET pages,
>>> controls, libraries, and the works.
>>>
>>> I try new builds, but so far none have been usable... the latest builds
>>> are completely unusable. I have checked it out on a simple solution
>>> with one winforms project, and it works well there, and it just reminds
>>> me how much I miss it. I can't wait until I can load up our projects
>>> into it without experiencing infinite exceptions, 50-100% CPU usage,
>>> etc. I'm the "point man" on our team for Resharper, and trust me, the
>>> MOMENT there's a stable-enough build, I'll switch to using it full time.
>>> I just wish that time were sooner rather than later (preferably two
>>> weeks ago!), but I guess I'll just have to be patient :)
>>>
>>>
>>> "Shimon Sim" <shimonsim048@community.nospam> wrote in message
>>> news:dsga85$qn$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>> The stability of R# depends on kind of project you are working on. If
>>>> it Class library it is very useful.
>>>> For ASP.NET was very good.
>>>> I really think one of you should try each new build and see if he fills
>>>> that he is working faster. If so he can pass the information to rest of
>>>> the team.
>>>> This decision needs about 2-3 hours of work.
>>>> Even if you read this news group you can see that experiences are quiet
>>>> different from user to user.
>>>> Good luck.
>>>> Shimon.
>>>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:dsg8ck$pbi$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>> My team recently migrated from VS2003 to VS2005 ... exclusively. This
>>>>> means we all had to leave ReSharper behind.
>>>>>
>>>>> Several members of the team looked at the specs for VS2005 and decided
>>>>> they probably didn't need ReSharper, after all, it had refactoring,
>>>>> and "code snippets" (like Live Templates), etc, etc.
>>>>>
>>>>> Well, having been forced to use VS2005 without ReSharper (the EAP
>>>>> version isn't stable enough to use for our projects yet, though I do
>>>>> test all new builds before reverting back to "plain" VS2005), I have
>>>>> to say... Microsoft's versions of ReSharper features are really,
>>>>> really awful.
>>>>>
>>>>> A perfect example is the "foreach" code snippet. It takes me longer
>>>>> to use that code snippet than it does to just type out the whole loop
>>>>> by hand. And create a new one? You mean, I have to hand-code an XML
>>>>> file?!? UGH! Never mind that even simple rename refactorings take too
>>>>> long and have many times completely screwed up (behaving more like a
>>>>> global search and replace than a true rename refactoring). And just
>>>>> the absence of any equivalent to Ctrl-N (Go To Class) is enough to
>>>>> drive me mad.
>>>>>
>>>>> Several of the people who originally said they could probably live
>>>>> without ReSharper have now done a 180 after only a week with VS2005.
>>>>> I am really, really hoping that ReSharper 2.0 gets stable enough to
>>>>> start using SOON. In fact, I hope JetBrains just stops trying to add
>>>>> new features and new bells and whistles, and just concentrates on
>>>>> fixing all the exceptions and performance issues, so I can stop
>>>>> developing with pain and frustration, and start Developing With
>>>>> Pleasure again!
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>



0
Comment actions Permalink

Hello Jeff,

Hear, hear!

We're waiting for a good build of R# for VS2005 before we move to it.
Can't afford the productivity loss!


I find the 2.17 build to be stable enough to give some productivity, and
ofcourse take some.
Guess I end up at about the same place I would, without the Resharper.

Anyway Resharper give me more pleasure on the way. :)


StianFagereng


0
Comment actions Permalink

Dear Paul,

Severe Rant Warning

In fact, I hope JetBrains just stops trying to add new features and new bells
and whistles, and just concentrates on fixing all the exceptions and
performance issues, so I can stop developing with pain and frustration, and
start Developing With Pleasure again!


Well, let's keep hoping. If you care to scroll back to the thread
'ReSharper EAP Reliability' from November 15, 2005, Valentin, the Chief
Scientist and Vice President of Product Development told us that they
would stop adding features. This was the time before build 211 came out.

Since then, only the following features where added (taken from the
change log on
http://www.jetbrains.net/confluence/display/ReSharper/Changes, I have
removed things that didn't look like features to me): [See list at end
of posting]

That's only 32 new features! :)

I guess what he wanted to say is that they would stop adding features to
their internal mythical list of things to do.

But who needs working Intellisense when one can convert an 'if' to an
'?:' operator? (Sorry about that one :O)

Still, I see progress from build to build, even in stability. But there
is definitely no priority on bug fixing.

Cheers,

Christian

New features since build 211:
Build 217
Context action: split declaration of multiple variables (locals or
fields) into separate declarations
Context action: add signature to anonymous method without explicit
signature

Build 216
Find Module Usages feature - works from popup menu on items under
'References' nodes in Solution Explorer - helps to find out why
particular reference is needed
Code completion: Ctrl-Shift-Space when delegate is expected allows to
produce anonymous delegate
Context action: loop conversion from 'foreach' to 'for' (when iterating
over IList or IList]]>)
Context action: creating custom implementation for an event
Context action: conversion of switch to if-else'if's
Context action: removing braces in "if" or other construct when the
block consists of only one statement
Context action: "Invert if" on 'if' keyword
Context action to reverse assignment (or multiple assignments in
selection)
Context action: conversion of 'if' into ?: operator (when possible)
Context actions: conversion of '==' into Equals and back
Optionally Visual Studio's items in popup menus that are covered by
ReSharper's functionality are replaced
VS2003: popup menu items on editor tabs: Close All and Close All but
This

Build 215
Context action: implement abstract member
Context action: merge declarations of a partial type
Context action: convert ?: operator to if-statement

Build 211
Editor: highlighting of caret row
Extract Class from Method Parameters refactoring
Generating Equals and GetHashCode method implementations (via Alt-Insert
popup)
Implement members: ability to generate fields for implemented properties
Implement members: option to generate explicit (private) implementations
Implement members: additional treatment of ISerializable interface
NAnt build files: completion for tags and attributes
Ctrl-N: auto-switch to searching in libraries when no matching type
found in solution
Obsolete attribute is taken into account by code highlighting and
intellisense
Context action for changing visibility modifier (available on visibility
modifier keyword)
Context action for splitting local variable declaration and
initialization
Context action for joining local variable declaration and initialization
Context actions for converting implicit interface member implementation
into explicit and vice versa
Context action for navigating implementations (overriding members) of
particular interface (class) in this class's bases list
Code completion: option to not narrow down list of suggestions (as in VS
intellisense)

0
Comment actions Permalink

"Christian Eitner" <ChristianREMOVE.Eitner@THISanton-paar.com> wrote in
message news:MPG.1e566065f85d1806989680@193.81.230.101...

But who needs working Intellisense when one can convert an 'if' to an
'?:' operator? (Sorry about that one :O)


I couldn't agree more. R#'s Intellisense hasn't been working since build 215
for me, and as I don't get any response on my posts about this I believe
this doesn't seem to be a great issue to JetBrains.

Patrick


0
Comment actions Permalink

Paul Bradshaw schrieb:

My team recently migrated from VS2003 to VS2005 ... exclusively. This means
we all had to leave ReSharper behind.

Several of the people who originally said they could probably live without
ReSharper have now done a 180 after only a week with VS2005. I am really,
really hoping that ReSharper 2.0 gets stable enough to start using SOON. In
fact, I hope JetBrains just stops trying to add new features and new bells
and whistles, and just concentrates on fixing all the exceptions and
performance issues, so I can stop developing with pain and frustration, and
start Developing With Pleasure again!


Full Ack!

Alexander

0
Comment actions Permalink

Thanks, Stian. I may have to temporarily move to 217 on VS2005 to do .NET
1.1 work. I need R#'s unit testing, but 216 and 217 for VS2003 don't work at
all on my machine and 215 just barely works. Error highlighting is confused,
IntelliSesnse stops working after a few minutes, many of the refactorings
don't work, etc.

Jeff

"Stian A. Fagereng" <Stian.fagereng@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:ba01064552d8c7fc287865669a@news.jetbrains.com...

Hello Jeff,

>
>> Hear, hear!
>>
>> We're waiting for a good build of R# for VS2005 before we move to it.
>> Can't afford the productivity loss!
>>
>

I find the 2.17 build to be stable enough to give some productivity, and
ofcourse take some.
Guess I end up at about the same place I would, without the Resharper.

>

Anyway Resharper give me more pleasure on the way. :)

>


StianFagereng

>



0
Comment actions Permalink

As far as the current R# build for 2k5 (build 217) goes, I have had a really
positive experience so far. We have a solution comprised of a thousand or
so classes spread over thirty C#/C++ projects, and R# has performed well.
The projects are essentially class libraries or executables so I can't speak
for web projects. I run a 1.6GHz laptop w/ a gig of RAM that also hosts SQL
Server 2005 and SQL Server 2000 instances. After reading these posts, I
must just be lucky.

At least bare-naked VS2005 is much better than bare-naked VS2003, in my
opinion.

-Blake

"Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
news:dsgmsg$qdq$1@is.intellij.net...
>I wish I had the option of going back to 165, but we're on VS2005
>exclusively now (large group of developers sharing project files) and so
>I'm stuck with bare-naked VS2005, and boy is it annoying.
>

I'm keeping my fingers crossed that build 218 (whever it comes out) is
"good enough" to actually keep it installed and use it.

>

"Arun" <akeserla@aristocrat-inc.com> wrote in message
news:dsgf9i$sc0$1@is.intellij.net...

>> My project is pretty huge too, I have been messing with resharper from
>> 201 till 213 (215 for a while). I have the same issues that force me to
>> go back to 165 until something stable comes up. Agreed the features until
>> 213 are stable but the memory requirements are bad and I often end up
>> getting OutOfMemoryException after working for a short time.
>>
>> I think though 165 is pretty limited it is my only option rather than
>> losing productivity until something stable comes along.
>>
>> -Arun
>>
>>
>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>> news:dsgd5l$jma$1@is.intellij.net...
>>> We have a very large application with websites and ASP.NET pages,
>>> controls, libraries, and the works.
>>>
>>> I try new builds, but so far none have been usable... the latest builds
>>> are completely unusable. I have checked it out on a simple solution
>>> with one winforms project, and it works well there, and it just reminds
>>> me how much I miss it. I can't wait until I can load up our projects
>>> into it without experiencing infinite exceptions, 50-100% CPU usage,
>>> etc. I'm the "point man" on our team for Resharper, and trust me, the
>>> MOMENT there's a stable-enough build, I'll switch to using it full time.
>>> I just wish that time were sooner rather than later (preferably two
>>> weeks ago!), but I guess I'll just have to be patient :)
>>>
>>>
>>> "Shimon Sim" <shimonsim048@community.nospam> wrote in message
>>> news:dsga85$qn$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>> The stability of R# depends on kind of project you are working on. If
>>>> it Class library it is very useful.
>>>> For ASP.NET was very good.
>>>> I really think one of you should try each new build and see if he fills
>>>> that he is working faster. If so he can pass the information to rest of
>>>> the team.
>>>> This decision needs about 2-3 hours of work.
>>>> Even if you read this news group you can see that experiences are quiet
>>>> different from user to user.
>>>> Good luck.
>>>> Shimon.
>>>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:dsg8ck$pbi$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>> My team recently migrated from VS2003 to VS2005 ... exclusively. This
>>>>> means we all had to leave ReSharper behind.
>>>>>
>>>>> Several members of the team looked at the specs for VS2005 and decided
>>>>> they probably didn't need ReSharper, after all, it had refactoring,
>>>>> and "code snippets" (like Live Templates), etc, etc.
>>>>>
>>>>> Well, having been forced to use VS2005 without ReSharper (the EAP
>>>>> version isn't stable enough to use for our projects yet, though I do
>>>>> test all new builds before reverting back to "plain" VS2005), I have
>>>>> to say... Microsoft's versions of ReSharper features are really,
>>>>> really awful.
>>>>>
>>>>> A perfect example is the "foreach" code snippet. It takes me longer
>>>>> to use that code snippet than it does to just type out the whole loop
>>>>> by hand. And create a new one? You mean, I have to hand-code an XML
>>>>> file?!? UGH! Never mind that even simple rename refactorings take too
>>>>> long and have many times completely screwed up (behaving more like a
>>>>> global search and replace than a true rename refactoring). And just
>>>>> the absence of any equivalent to Ctrl-N (Go To Class) is enough to
>>>>> drive me mad.
>>>>>
>>>>> Several of the people who originally said they could probably live
>>>>> without ReSharper have now done a 180 after only a week with VS2005.
>>>>> I am really, really hoping that ReSharper 2.0 gets stable enough to
>>>>> start using SOON. In fact, I hope JetBrains just stops trying to add
>>>>> new features and new bells and whistles, and just concentrates on
>>>>> fixing all the exceptions and performance issues, so I can stop
>>>>> developing with pain and frustration, and start Developing With
>>>>> Pleasure again!
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>



0
Comment actions Permalink

Dear Christian and all EAP members,

Christian Eitner wrote:

Dear Paul,

Severe Rant Warning

>> In fact, I hope JetBrains just stops trying to add new features and new bells
>> and whistles, and just concentrates on fixing all the exceptions and
>> performance issues, so I can stop developing with pain and frustration, and
>> start Developing With Pleasure again!


Well, let's keep hoping. If you care to scroll back to the thread
'ReSharper EAP Reliability' from November 15, 2005, Valentin, the Chief
Scientist and Vice President of Product Development told us that they
would stop adding features. This was the time before build 211 came out.

Since then, only the following features where added

That's only 32 new features! :)

I guess what he wanted to say is that they would stop adding features to
their internal mythical list of things to do.



Still, I see progress from build to build, even in stability. But there
is definitely no priority on bug fixing.


it certainly occurred to us that we should probably keep you updated on
what we are actually working on in ReSharper at the moment, and should
not rely on that being obvious from the builds we publish ;)

Starting from build 214, ReSharper sports asynchronous start-up
procedure. This means that we In the upcoming build 218 there is no
modal progress dialog at startup at all.

As you may have guessed, implementing all that means major code
overhaul. Lots of code have been rewritten, lots of internal logic have
been redesigned.

I am not sure to what extent this work qualifies as "bug fixing" as
opposed to "new features" - it is certainly both. At the moment this
major overhaul is mostly over and we are concentrating on stability and
bug fixing.

As to a list of implemented features that you have posted: as you may
seen, most of those are something called "context actions" - just small
coding assistants. All of those are relatively small, and they do not
really take much resources from the team. Other "features" listed there
are in fact bordering on being called "bugs", such as making completion
aware of C# 2.0 syntax and the like.

Anyway, thank you all for your patience, for your criticism and your
occasional praise.
I hope that we will not yet exhausted the first, we will get lots of
constructive second and the third will get rid of its qualifier :)

Cheers,
Dmitry
--
Dmitry Lomov
Senior Software Developer
JetBrains Inc.
http://www.jetbrains.com
"Develop With Pleasure!"

0
Comment actions Permalink

I second that as well, moving from VS.Net 2003 with resharper to VS.Net 2005
was like getting knocked back a few years and being forced to work with
crappy tools again. .Net simply isn't usable without Resharper, I'm not
doing any more projects in .Net 2005 until Resharper is stable and ready to
be used.

"Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
news:dsg8ck$pbi$1@is.intellij.net...

My team recently migrated from VS2003 to VS2005 ... exclusively. This
means we all had to leave ReSharper behind.

>

Several members of the team looked at the specs for VS2005 and decided
they probably didn't need ReSharper, after all, it had refactoring, and
"code snippets" (like Live Templates), etc, etc.

>

Well, having been forced to use VS2005 without ReSharper (the EAP version
isn't stable enough to use for our projects yet, though I do test all new
builds before reverting back to "plain" VS2005), I have to say...
Microsoft's versions of ReSharper features are really, really awful.

>

A perfect example is the "foreach" code snippet. It takes me longer to
use that code snippet than it does to just type out the whole loop by
hand. And create a new one? You mean, I have to hand-code an XML file?!?
UGH! Never mind that even simple rename refactorings take too long and
have many times completely screwed up (behaving more like a global search
and replace than a true rename refactoring). And just the absence of any
equivalent to Ctrl-N (Go To Class) is enough to drive me mad.

>

Several of the people who originally said they could probably live without
ReSharper have now done a 180 after only a week with VS2005. I am really,
really hoping that ReSharper 2.0 gets stable enough to start using SOON.
In fact, I hope JetBrains just stops trying to add new features and new
bells and whistles, and just concentrates on fixing all the exceptions and
performance issues, so I can stop developing with pain and frustration,
and start Developing With Pleasure again!

>
>



0
Comment actions Permalink

Well, I have run into a snag -- my solution may have gotten too big to use
R#. It turns out that with the R# add-in enabled and VS2005 running for a
couple of hours, SQL Server 2005 eventually slows to a crawl, to the point
that it is unusable. When the add-in is disabled, my system runs just fine.

I love the R# features but have sadly had to disable it for now.

-Blake

"Blake Bishop" <bbishop@sorenson.com> wrote in message
news:dsi9ki$qpr$1@is.intellij.net...

As far as the current R# build for 2k5 (build 217) goes, I have had a
really positive experience so far. We have a solution comprised of a
thousand or so classes spread over thirty C#/C++ projects, and R# has
performed well. The projects are essentially class libraries or
executables so I can't speak for web projects. I run a 1.6GHz laptop w/ a
gig of RAM that also hosts SQL Server 2005 and SQL Server 2000 instances.
After reading these posts, I must just be lucky.

>

At least bare-naked VS2005 is much better than bare-naked VS2003, in my
opinion.

>

-Blake

>

"Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
news:dsgmsg$qdq$1@is.intellij.net...

>>I wish I had the option of going back to 165, but we're on VS2005
>>exclusively now (large group of developers sharing project files) and so
>>I'm stuck with bare-naked VS2005, and boy is it annoying.
>>
>> I'm keeping my fingers crossed that build 218 (whever it comes out) is
>> "good enough" to actually keep it installed and use it.
>>
>> "Arun" <akeserla@aristocrat-inc.com> wrote in message
>> news:dsgf9i$sc0$1@is.intellij.net...
>>> My project is pretty huge too, I have been messing with resharper from
>>> 201 till 213 (215 for a while). I have the same issues that force me to
>>> go back to 165 until something stable comes up. Agreed the features
>>> until 213 are stable but the memory requirements are bad and I often end
>>> up getting OutOfMemoryException after working for a short time.
>>>
>>> I think though 165 is pretty limited it is my only option rather than
>>> losing productivity until something stable comes along.
>>>
>>> -Arun
>>>
>>>
>>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>>> news:dsgd5l$jma$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>> We have a very large application with websites and ASP.NET pages,
>>>> controls, libraries, and the works.
>>>>
>>>> I try new builds, but so far none have been usable... the latest builds
>>>> are completely unusable. I have checked it out on a simple solution
>>>> with one winforms project, and it works well there, and it just reminds
>>>> me how much I miss it. I can't wait until I can load up our projects
>>>> into it without experiencing infinite exceptions, 50-100% CPU usage,
>>>> etc. I'm the "point man" on our team for Resharper, and trust me, the
>>>> MOMENT there's a stable-enough build, I'll switch to using it full
>>>> time. I just wish that time were sooner rather than later (preferably
>>>> two weeks ago!), but I guess I'll just have to be patient :)
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> "Shimon Sim" <shimonsim048@community.nospam> wrote in message
>>>> news:dsga85$qn$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>> The stability of R# depends on kind of project you are working on. If
>>>>> it Class library it is very useful.
>>>>> For ASP.NET was very good.
>>>>> I really think one of you should try each new build and see if he
>>>>> fills that he is working faster. If so he can pass the information to
>>>>> rest of the team.
>>>>> This decision needs about 2-3 hours of work.
>>>>> Even if you read this news group you can see that experiences are
>>>>> quiet different from user to user.
>>>>> Good luck.
>>>>> Shimon.
>>>>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>>>>> news:dsg8ck$pbi$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>>> My team recently migrated from VS2003 to VS2005 ... exclusively.
>>>>>> This means we all had to leave ReSharper behind.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Several members of the team looked at the specs for VS2005 and
>>>>>> decided they probably didn't need ReSharper, after all, it had
>>>>>> refactoring, and "code snippets" (like Live Templates), etc, etc.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Well, having been forced to use VS2005 without ReSharper (the EAP
>>>>>> version isn't stable enough to use for our projects yet, though I do
>>>>>> test all new builds before reverting back to "plain" VS2005), I have
>>>>>> to say... Microsoft's versions of ReSharper features are really,
>>>>>> really awful.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> A perfect example is the "foreach" code snippet. It takes me longer
>>>>>> to use that code snippet than it does to just type out the whole loop
>>>>>> by hand. And create a new one? You mean, I have to hand-code an XML
>>>>>> file?!? UGH! Never mind that even simple rename refactorings take too
>>>>>> long and have many times completely screwed up (behaving more like a
>>>>>> global search and replace than a true rename refactoring). And just
>>>>>> the absence of any equivalent to Ctrl-N (Go To Class) is enough to
>>>>>> drive me mad.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Several of the people who originally said they could probably live
>>>>>> without ReSharper have now done a 180 after only a week with VS2005.
>>>>>> I am really, really hoping that ReSharper 2.0 gets stable enough to
>>>>>> start using SOON. In fact, I hope JetBrains just stops trying to add
>>>>>> new features and new bells and whistles, and just concentrates on
>>>>>> fixing all the exceptions and performance issues, so I can stop
>>>>>> developing with pain and frustration, and start Developing With
>>>>>> Pleasure again!
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>



0
Comment actions Permalink

Hello Blake,

I'm not sure that the problem with slow browsing of SQL Server in Server
Explorer (which as I understand happens for you)
is related to the size of your solution. We've been reported that ReSharper
slows down Server Explorer (because it inadvertently
forces creation of remote connections) and are going to fix it ASAP.


Regards,
Dmitry Shaporenkov
JetBrains, Inc
http://www.jetbrains.com
"Develop with pleasure!"

Well, I have run into a snag -- my solution may have gotten too big to
use R#. It turns out that with the R# add-in enabled and VS2005
running for a couple of hours, SQL Server 2005 eventually slows to a
crawl, to the point that it is unusable. When the add-in is disabled,
my system runs just fine.

I love the R# features but have sadly had to disable it for now.

-Blake

"Blake Bishop" <bbishop@sorenson.com> wrote in message
news:dsi9ki$qpr$1@is.intellij.net...

>> As far as the current R# build for 2k5 (build 217) goes, I have had a
>> really positive experience so far. We have a solution comprised of a
>> thousand or so classes spread over thirty C#/C++ projects, and R# has
>> performed well. The projects are essentially class libraries or
>> executables so I can't speak for web projects. I run a 1.6GHz laptop
>> w/ a gig of RAM that also hosts SQL Server 2005 and SQL Server 2000
>> instances. After reading these posts, I must just be lucky.
>>
>> At least bare-naked VS2005 is much better than bare-naked VS2003, in
>> my opinion.
>>
>> -Blake
>>
>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>> news:dsgmsg$qdq$1@is.intellij.net...
>>
>>> I wish I had the option of going back to 165, but we're on VS2005
>>> exclusively now (large group of developers sharing project files)
>>> and so I'm stuck with bare-naked VS2005, and boy is it annoying.
>>>
>>> I'm keeping my fingers crossed that build 218 (whever it comes out)
>>> is "good enough" to actually keep it installed and use it.
>>>
>>> "Arun" <akeserla@aristocrat-inc.com> wrote in message
>>> news:dsgf9i$sc0$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>
>>>> My project is pretty huge too, I have been messing with resharper
>>>> from 201 till 213 (215 for a while). I have the same issues that
>>>> force me to go back to 165 until something stable comes up. Agreed
>>>> the features until 213 are stable but the memory requirements are
>>>> bad and I often end up getting OutOfMemoryException after working
>>>> for a short time.
>>>>
>>>> I think though 165 is pretty limited it is my only option rather
>>>> than losing productivity until something stable comes along.
>>>>
>>>> -Arun
>>>>
>>>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:dsgd5l$jma$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>
>>>>> We have a very large application with websites and ASP.NET pages,
>>>>> controls, libraries, and the works.
>>>>>
>>>>> I try new builds, but so far none have been usable... the latest
>>>>> builds are completely unusable. I have checked it out on a simple
>>>>> solution with one winforms project, and it works well there, and
>>>>> it just reminds me how much I miss it. I can't wait until I can
>>>>> load up our projects into it without experiencing infinite
>>>>> exceptions, 50-100% CPU usage, etc. I'm the "point man" on our
>>>>> team for Resharper, and trust me, the MOMENT there's a
>>>>> stable-enough build, I'll switch to using it full time. I just
>>>>> wish that time were sooner rather than later (preferably two weeks
>>>>> ago!), but I guess I'll just have to be patient :)
>>>>>
>>>>> "Shimon Sim" <shimonsim048@community.nospam> wrote in message
>>>>> news:dsga85$qn$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>>
>>>>>> The stability of R# depends on kind of project you are working
>>>>>> on. If
>>>>>> it Class library it is very useful.
>>>>>> For ASP.NET was very good.
>>>>>> I really think one of you should try each new build and see if he
>>>>>> fills that he is working faster. If so he can pass the
>>>>>> information to
>>>>>> rest of the team.
>>>>>> This decision needs about 2-3 hours of work.
>>>>>> Even if you read this news group you can see that experiences are
>>>>>> quiet different from user to user.
>>>>>> Good luck.
>>>>>> Shimon.
>>>>>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:dsg8ck$pbi$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>>>> My team recently migrated from VS2003 to VS2005 ... exclusively.
>>>>>>> This means we all had to leave ReSharper behind.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Several members of the team looked at the specs for VS2005 and
>>>>>>> decided they probably didn't need ReSharper, after all, it had
>>>>>>> refactoring, and "code snippets" (like Live Templates), etc,
>>>>>>> etc.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Well, having been forced to use VS2005 without ReSharper (the
>>>>>>> EAP version isn't stable enough to use for our projects yet,
>>>>>>> though I do test all new builds before reverting back to "plain"
>>>>>>> VS2005), I have to say... Microsoft's versions of ReSharper
>>>>>>> features are really, really awful.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> A perfect example is the "foreach" code snippet. It takes me
>>>>>>> longer to use that code snippet than it does to just type out
>>>>>>> the whole loop by hand. And create a new one? You mean, I have
>>>>>>> to hand-code an XML file?!? UGH! Never mind that even simple
>>>>>>> rename refactorings take too long and have many times completely
>>>>>>> screwed up (behaving more like a global search and replace than
>>>>>>> a true rename refactoring). And just the absence of any
>>>>>>> equivalent to Ctrl-N (Go To Class) is enough to drive me mad.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Several of the people who originally said they could probably
>>>>>>> live without ReSharper have now done a 180 after only a week
>>>>>>> with VS2005. I am really, really hoping that ReSharper 2.0 gets
>>>>>>> stable enough to start using SOON. In fact, I hope JetBrains
>>>>>>> just stops trying to add new features and new bells and
>>>>>>> whistles, and just concentrates on fixing all the exceptions and
>>>>>>> performance issues, so I can stop developing with pain and
>>>>>>> frustration, and start Developing With Pleasure again!
>>>>>>>


0
Comment actions Permalink

Thanks for the comments, Dmitry.

I wanted to clarify that the behavior I'm seeing isn't necessarily browsing
issues from within SQL 2005 Management Studio, it is slow query execution
both from within SQL Server Management Studio and from my .NET application.
I also have remote connections disabled in SQL2005.

Blake


"Dmitry Shaporenkov (JetBrains)" <dsha@jetbrains.com> wrote in message
news:c8a894d9102d3e8c800252e6d1881@news.intellij.net...

Hello Blake,

>

I'm not sure that the problem with slow browsing of SQL Server in Server
Explorer (which as I understand happens for you)
is related to the size of your solution. We've been reported that
ReSharper slows down Server Explorer (because it inadvertently
forces creation of remote connections) and are going to fix it ASAP.

>
>

Regards,
Dmitry Shaporenkov
JetBrains, Inc
http://www.jetbrains.com
"Develop with pleasure!"

>
>> Well, I have run into a snag -- my solution may have gotten too big to
>> use R#. It turns out that with the R# add-in enabled and VS2005
>> running for a couple of hours, SQL Server 2005 eventually slows to a
>> crawl, to the point that it is unusable. When the add-in is disabled,
>> my system runs just fine.
>>
>> I love the R# features but have sadly had to disable it for now.
>>
>> -Blake
>>
>> "Blake Bishop" <bbishop@sorenson.com> wrote in message
>> news:dsi9ki$qpr$1@is.intellij.net...
>>
>>> As far as the current R# build for 2k5 (build 217) goes, I have had a
>>> really positive experience so far. We have a solution comprised of a
>>> thousand or so classes spread over thirty C#/C++ projects, and R# has
>>> performed well. The projects are essentially class libraries or
>>> executables so I can't speak for web projects. I run a 1.6GHz laptop
>>> w/ a gig of RAM that also hosts SQL Server 2005 and SQL Server 2000
>>> instances. After reading these posts, I must just be lucky.
>>>
>>> At least bare-naked VS2005 is much better than bare-naked VS2003, in
>>> my opinion.
>>>
>>> -Blake
>>>
>>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>>> news:dsgmsg$qdq$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>
>>>> I wish I had the option of going back to 165, but we're on VS2005
>>>> exclusively now (large group of developers sharing project files)
>>>> and so I'm stuck with bare-naked VS2005, and boy is it annoying.
>>>>
>>>> I'm keeping my fingers crossed that build 218 (whever it comes out)
>>>> is "good enough" to actually keep it installed and use it.
>>>>
>>>> "Arun" <akeserla@aristocrat-inc.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:dsgf9i$sc0$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>
>>>>> My project is pretty huge too, I have been messing with resharper
>>>>> from 201 till 213 (215 for a while). I have the same issues that
>>>>> force me to go back to 165 until something stable comes up. Agreed
>>>>> the features until 213 are stable but the memory requirements are
>>>>> bad and I often end up getting OutOfMemoryException after working
>>>>> for a short time.
>>>>>
>>>>> I think though 165 is pretty limited it is my only option rather
>>>>> than losing productivity until something stable comes along.
>>>>>
>>>>> -Arun
>>>>>
>>>>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>>>>> news:dsgd5l$jma$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>>
>>>>>> We have a very large application with websites and ASP.NET pages,
>>>>>> controls, libraries, and the works.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I try new builds, but so far none have been usable... the latest
>>>>>> builds are completely unusable. I have checked it out on a simple
>>>>>> solution with one winforms project, and it works well there, and
>>>>>> it just reminds me how much I miss it. I can't wait until I can
>>>>>> load up our projects into it without experiencing infinite
>>>>>> exceptions, 50-100% CPU usage, etc. I'm the "point man" on our
>>>>>> team for Resharper, and trust me, the MOMENT there's a
>>>>>> stable-enough build, I'll switch to using it full time. I just
>>>>>> wish that time were sooner rather than later (preferably two weeks
>>>>>> ago!), but I guess I'll just have to be patient :)
>>>>>>
>>>>>> "Shimon Sim" <shimonsim048@community.nospam> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:dsga85$qn$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> The stability of R# depends on kind of project you are working
>>>>>>> on. If
>>>>>>> it Class library it is very useful.
>>>>>>> For ASP.NET was very good.
>>>>>>> I really think one of you should try each new build and see if he
>>>>>>> fills that he is working faster. If so he can pass the
>>>>>>> information to
>>>>>>> rest of the team.
>>>>>>> This decision needs about 2-3 hours of work.
>>>>>>> Even if you read this news group you can see that experiences are
>>>>>>> quiet different from user to user.
>>>>>>> Good luck.
>>>>>>> Shimon.
>>>>>>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>>>>>>> news:dsg8ck$pbi$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>>>>> My team recently migrated from VS2003 to VS2005 ... exclusively.
>>>>>>>> This means we all had to leave ReSharper behind.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Several members of the team looked at the specs for VS2005 and
>>>>>>>> decided they probably didn't need ReSharper, after all, it had
>>>>>>>> refactoring, and "code snippets" (like Live Templates), etc,
>>>>>>>> etc.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Well, having been forced to use VS2005 without ReSharper (the
>>>>>>>> EAP version isn't stable enough to use for our projects yet,
>>>>>>>> though I do test all new builds before reverting back to "plain"
>>>>>>>> VS2005), I have to say... Microsoft's versions of ReSharper
>>>>>>>> features are really, really awful.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> A perfect example is the "foreach" code snippet. It takes me
>>>>>>>> longer to use that code snippet than it does to just type out
>>>>>>>> the whole loop by hand. And create a new one? You mean, I have
>>>>>>>> to hand-code an XML file?!? UGH! Never mind that even simple
>>>>>>>> rename refactorings take too long and have many times completely
>>>>>>>> screwed up (behaving more like a global search and replace than
>>>>>>>> a true rename refactoring). And just the absence of any
>>>>>>>> equivalent to Ctrl-N (Go To Class) is enough to drive me mad.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Several of the people who originally said they could probably
>>>>>>>> live without ReSharper have now done a 180 after only a week
>>>>>>>> with VS2005. I am really, really hoping that ReSharper 2.0 gets
>>>>>>>> stable enough to start using SOON. In fact, I hope JetBrains
>>>>>>>> just stops trying to add new features and new bells and
>>>>>>>> whistles, and just concentrates on fixing all the exceptions and
>>>>>>>> performance issues, so I can stop developing with pain and
>>>>>>>> frustration, and start Developing With Pleasure again!
>>>>>>>>
>



0
Comment actions Permalink

Well, I can hardly figure out how can ReSharper affect the performance of
SQL Server...
If only the SQL Server is not installed on the same machine where you're
working in VS with ReSharper,
and hence suffers from the consequences of an overall performance degradation.

Regards,
Dmitry Shaporenkov
JetBrains, Inc
http://www.jetbrains.com
"Develop with pleasure!"

Thanks for the comments, Dmitry.

I wanted to clarify that the behavior I'm seeing isn't necessarily
browsing issues from within SQL 2005 Management Studio, it is slow
query execution both from within SQL Server Management Studio and from
my .NET application. I also have remote connections disabled in
SQL2005.

Blake

"Dmitry Shaporenkov (JetBrains)" <dsha@jetbrains.com> wrote in message
news:c8a894d9102d3e8c800252e6d1881@news.intellij.net...

>> Hello Blake,
>>
>> I'm not sure that the problem with slow browsing of SQL Server in
>> Server
>> Explorer (which as I understand happens for you)
>> is related to the size of your solution. We've been reported that
>> ReSharper slows down Server Explorer (because it inadvertently
>> forces creation of remote connections) and are going to fix it ASAP.
>> Regards,
>> Dmitry Shaporenkov
>> JetBrains, Inc
>> http://www.jetbrains.com
>> "Develop with pleasure!"
>>> Well, I have run into a snag -- my solution may have gotten too big
>>> to use R#. It turns out that with the R# add-in enabled and VS2005
>>> running for a couple of hours, SQL Server 2005 eventually slows to a
>>> crawl, to the point that it is unusable. When the add-in is
>>> disabled, my system runs just fine.
>>>
>>> I love the R# features but have sadly had to disable it for now.
>>>
>>> -Blake
>>>
>>> "Blake Bishop" <bbishop@sorenson.com> wrote in message
>>> news:dsi9ki$qpr$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>
>>>> As far as the current R# build for 2k5 (build 217) goes, I have had
>>>> a really positive experience so far. We have a solution comprised
>>>> of a thousand or so classes spread over thirty C#/C++ projects, and
>>>> R# has performed well. The projects are essentially class libraries
>>>> or executables so I can't speak for web projects. I run a 1.6GHz
>>>> laptop w/ a gig of RAM that also hosts SQL Server 2005 and SQL
>>>> Server 2000 instances. After reading these posts, I must just be
>>>> lucky.
>>>>
>>>> At least bare-naked VS2005 is much better than bare-naked VS2003,
>>>> in my opinion.
>>>>
>>>> -Blake
>>>>
>>>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:dsgmsg$qdq$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>
>>>>> I wish I had the option of going back to 165, but we're on VS2005
>>>>> exclusively now (large group of developers sharing project files)
>>>>> and so I'm stuck with bare-naked VS2005, and boy is it annoying.
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm keeping my fingers crossed that build 218 (whever it comes
>>>>> out) is "good enough" to actually keep it installed and use it.
>>>>>
>>>>> "Arun" <akeserla@aristocrat-inc.com> wrote in message
>>>>> news:dsgf9i$sc0$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>>
>>>>>> My project is pretty huge too, I have been messing with resharper
>>>>>> from 201 till 213 (215 for a while). I have the same issues that
>>>>>> force me to go back to 165 until something stable comes up.
>>>>>> Agreed the features until 213 are stable but the memory
>>>>>> requirements are bad and I often end up getting
>>>>>> OutOfMemoryException after working for a short time.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I think though 165 is pretty limited it is my only option rather
>>>>>> than losing productivity until something stable comes along.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> -Arun
>>>>>>
>>>>>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:dsgd5l$jma$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> We have a very large application with websites and ASP.NET
>>>>>>> pages, controls, libraries, and the works.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I try new builds, but so far none have been usable... the latest
>>>>>>> builds are completely unusable. I have checked it out on a
>>>>>>> simple solution with one winforms project, and it works well
>>>>>>> there, and it just reminds me how much I miss it. I can't wait
>>>>>>> until I can load up our projects into it without experiencing
>>>>>>> infinite exceptions, 50-100% CPU usage, etc. I'm the "point
>>>>>>> man" on our team for Resharper, and trust me, the MOMENT there's
>>>>>>> a stable-enough build, I'll switch to using it full time. I just
>>>>>>> wish that time were sooner rather than later (preferably two
>>>>>>> weeks ago!), but I guess I'll just have to be patient :)
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> "Shimon Sim" <shimonsim048@community.nospam> wrote in message
>>>>>>> news:dsga85$qn$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> The stability of R# depends on kind of project you are working
>>>>>>>> on. If
>>>>>>>> it Class library it is very useful.
>>>>>>>> For ASP.NET was very good.
>>>>>>>> I really think one of you should try each new build and see if
>>>>>>>> he
>>>>>>>> fills that he is working faster. If so he can pass the
>>>>>>>> information to
>>>>>>>> rest of the team.
>>>>>>>> This decision needs about 2-3 hours of work.
>>>>>>>> Even if you read this news group you can see that experiences
>>>>>>>> are
>>>>>>>> quiet different from user to user.
>>>>>>>> Good luck.
>>>>>>>> Shimon.
>>>>>>>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>>>>>>>> news:dsg8ck$pbi$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>>>>>> My team recently migrated from VS2003 to VS2005 ...
>>>>>>>>> exclusively. This means we all had to leave ReSharper behind.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Several members of the team looked at the specs for VS2005 and
>>>>>>>>> decided they probably didn't need ReSharper, after all, it had
>>>>>>>>> refactoring, and "code snippets" (like Live Templates), etc,
>>>>>>>>> etc.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Well, having been forced to use VS2005 without ReSharper (the
>>>>>>>>> EAP version isn't stable enough to use for our projects yet,
>>>>>>>>> though I do test all new builds before reverting back to
>>>>>>>>> "plain" VS2005), I have to say... Microsoft's versions of
>>>>>>>>> ReSharper features are really, really awful.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> A perfect example is the "foreach" code snippet. It takes me
>>>>>>>>> longer to use that code snippet than it does to just type out
>>>>>>>>> the whole loop by hand. And create a new one? You mean, I
>>>>>>>>> have to hand-code an XML file?!? UGH! Never mind that even
>>>>>>>>> simple rename refactorings take too long and have many times
>>>>>>>>> completely screwed up (behaving more like a global search and
>>>>>>>>> replace than a true rename refactoring). And just the absence
>>>>>>>>> of any equivalent to Ctrl-N (Go To Class) is enough to drive
>>>>>>>>> me mad.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Several of the people who originally said they could probably
>>>>>>>>> live without ReSharper have now done a 180 after only a week
>>>>>>>>> with VS2005. I am really, really hoping that ReSharper 2.0
>>>>>>>>> gets stable enough to start using SOON. In fact, I hope
>>>>>>>>> JetBrains just stops trying to add new features and new bells
>>>>>>>>> and whistles, and just concentrates on fixing all the
>>>>>>>>> exceptions and performance issues, so I can stop developing
>>>>>>>>> with pain and frustration, and start Developing With Pleasure
>>>>>>>>> again!
>>>>>>>>>


0
Comment actions Permalink

Yes, it is possible that I have just simply run out of resources overall,
but this is because VS2005 with R# installed ended up consuming over 800Mb
of memory over time while VS2005 by itself only takes about 300Mb with my
solution loaded. So, you are correct that R# isn't "directly" affecting the
performance of SQL Server -- it is indirectly affecting it (and probably any
other memory-intensive applications) by eating up more memory than I can
afford.

However, I am guessing that this huge memory consumption might be a bug in
R# (or maybe VS2005, who knows) because I re-enabled R# (I can't seem to
live without it :) and have not seen any huge memory consumption for about
a day now, which also means that SQL Server is happy.

I have to run SQL on my laptop because I work in multiple locations and have
to be able to work while not connected to a network.

Blake

"Dmitry Shaporenkov (JetBrains)" <dsha@jetbrains.com> wrote in message
news:c8a894d91033fd8c8007355fee11b@news.intellij.net...

Well, I can hardly figure out how can ReSharper affect the performance of
SQL Server...
If only the SQL Server is not installed on the same machine where you're
working in VS with ReSharper,
and hence suffers from the consequences of an overall performance
degradation.

>

Regards,
Dmitry Shaporenkov
JetBrains, Inc
http://www.jetbrains.com
"Develop with pleasure!"

>
>> Thanks for the comments, Dmitry.
>>
>> I wanted to clarify that the behavior I'm seeing isn't necessarily
>> browsing issues from within SQL 2005 Management Studio, it is slow
>> query execution both from within SQL Server Management Studio and from
>> my .NET application. I also have remote connections disabled in
>> SQL2005.
>>
>> Blake
>>
>> "Dmitry Shaporenkov (JetBrains)" <dsha@jetbrains.com> wrote in message
>> news:c8a894d9102d3e8c800252e6d1881@news.intellij.net...
>>
>>> Hello Blake,
>>>
>>> I'm not sure that the problem with slow browsing of SQL Server in
>>> Server
>>> Explorer (which as I understand happens for you)
>>> is related to the size of your solution. We've been reported that
>>> ReSharper slows down Server Explorer (because it inadvertently
>>> forces creation of remote connections) and are going to fix it ASAP.
>>> Regards,
>>> Dmitry Shaporenkov
>>> JetBrains, Inc
>>> http://www.jetbrains.com
>>> "Develop with pleasure!"
>>>> Well, I have run into a snag -- my solution may have gotten too big
>>>> to use R#. It turns out that with the R# add-in enabled and VS2005
>>>> running for a couple of hours, SQL Server 2005 eventually slows to a
>>>> crawl, to the point that it is unusable. When the add-in is
>>>> disabled, my system runs just fine.
>>>>
>>>> I love the R# features but have sadly had to disable it for now.
>>>>
>>>> -Blake
>>>>
>>>> "Blake Bishop" <bbishop@sorenson.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:dsi9ki$qpr$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>
>>>>> As far as the current R# build for 2k5 (build 217) goes, I have had
>>>>> a really positive experience so far. We have a solution comprised
>>>>> of a thousand or so classes spread over thirty C#/C++ projects, and
>>>>> R# has performed well. The projects are essentially class libraries
>>>>> or executables so I can't speak for web projects. I run a 1.6GHz
>>>>> laptop w/ a gig of RAM that also hosts SQL Server 2005 and SQL
>>>>> Server 2000 instances. After reading these posts, I must just be
>>>>> lucky.
>>>>>
>>>>> At least bare-naked VS2005 is much better than bare-naked VS2003,
>>>>> in my opinion.
>>>>>
>>>>> -Blake
>>>>>
>>>>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>>>>> news:dsgmsg$qdq$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>>
>>>>>> I wish I had the option of going back to 165, but we're on VS2005
>>>>>> exclusively now (large group of developers sharing project files)
>>>>>> and so I'm stuck with bare-naked VS2005, and boy is it annoying.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I'm keeping my fingers crossed that build 218 (whever it comes
>>>>>> out) is "good enough" to actually keep it installed and use it.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> "Arun" <akeserla@aristocrat-inc.com> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:dsgf9i$sc0$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> My project is pretty huge too, I have been messing with resharper
>>>>>>> from 201 till 213 (215 for a while). I have the same issues that
>>>>>>> force me to go back to 165 until something stable comes up.
>>>>>>> Agreed the features until 213 are stable but the memory
>>>>>>> requirements are bad and I often end up getting
>>>>>>> OutOfMemoryException after working for a short time.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I think though 165 is pretty limited it is my only option rather
>>>>>>> than losing productivity until something stable comes along.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> -Arun
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>>>>>>> news:dsgd5l$jma$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> We have a very large application with websites and ASP.NET
>>>>>>>> pages, controls, libraries, and the works.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I try new builds, but so far none have been usable... the latest
>>>>>>>> builds are completely unusable. I have checked it out on a
>>>>>>>> simple solution with one winforms project, and it works well
>>>>>>>> there, and it just reminds me how much I miss it. I can't wait
>>>>>>>> until I can load up our projects into it without experiencing
>>>>>>>> infinite exceptions, 50-100% CPU usage, etc. I'm the "point
>>>>>>>> man" on our team for Resharper, and trust me, the MOMENT there's
>>>>>>>> a stable-enough build, I'll switch to using it full time. I just
>>>>>>>> wish that time were sooner rather than later (preferably two
>>>>>>>> weeks ago!), but I guess I'll just have to be patient :)
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> "Shimon Sim" <shimonsim048@community.nospam> wrote in message
>>>>>>>> news:dsga85$qn$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> The stability of R# depends on kind of project you are working
>>>>>>>>> on. If
>>>>>>>>> it Class library it is very useful.
>>>>>>>>> For ASP.NET was very good.
>>>>>>>>> I really think one of you should try each new build and see if
>>>>>>>>> he
>>>>>>>>> fills that he is working faster. If so he can pass the
>>>>>>>>> information to
>>>>>>>>> rest of the team.
>>>>>>>>> This decision needs about 2-3 hours of work.
>>>>>>>>> Even if you read this news group you can see that experiences
>>>>>>>>> are
>>>>>>>>> quiet different from user to user.
>>>>>>>>> Good luck.
>>>>>>>>> Shimon.
>>>>>>>>> "Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
>>>>>>>>> news:dsg8ck$pbi$1@is.intellij.net...
>>>>>>>>>> My team recently migrated from VS2003 to VS2005 ...
>>>>>>>>>> exclusively. This means we all had to leave ReSharper behind.
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> Several members of the team looked at the specs for VS2005 and
>>>>>>>>>> decided they probably didn't need ReSharper, after all, it had
>>>>>>>>>> refactoring, and "code snippets" (like Live Templates), etc,
>>>>>>>>>> etc.
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> Well, having been forced to use VS2005 without ReSharper (the
>>>>>>>>>> EAP version isn't stable enough to use for our projects yet,
>>>>>>>>>> though I do test all new builds before reverting back to
>>>>>>>>>> "plain" VS2005), I have to say... Microsoft's versions of
>>>>>>>>>> ReSharper features are really, really awful.
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> A perfect example is the "foreach" code snippet. It takes me
>>>>>>>>>> longer to use that code snippet than it does to just type out
>>>>>>>>>> the whole loop by hand. And create a new one? You mean, I
>>>>>>>>>> have to hand-code an XML file?!? UGH! Never mind that even
>>>>>>>>>> simple rename refactorings take too long and have many times
>>>>>>>>>> completely screwed up (behaving more like a global search and
>>>>>>>>>> replace than a true rename refactoring). And just the absence
>>>>>>>>>> of any equivalent to Ctrl-N (Go To Class) is enough to drive
>>>>>>>>>> me mad.
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> Several of the people who originally said they could probably
>>>>>>>>>> live without ReSharper have now done a 180 after only a week
>>>>>>>>>> with VS2005. I am really, really hoping that ReSharper 2.0
>>>>>>>>>> gets stable enough to start using SOON. In fact, I hope
>>>>>>>>>> JetBrains just stops trying to add new features and new bells
>>>>>>>>>> and whistles, and just concentrates on fixing all the
>>>>>>>>>> exceptions and performance issues, so I can stop developing
>>>>>>>>>> with pain and frustration, and start Developing With Pleasure
>>>>>>>>>> again!
>>>>>>>>>>
>



0
Comment actions Permalink

I initially used the refactoring support in Visual Studio 2005 and found
that it provided only the bare bones refactoring tools and failed to provide
a good set of essentials. Then again, maybe I am so accustomed to using
ReSharper that anything less is "unusable." Rename kinda sorta works in
Visual Studio 2005, but the options to fix comments and strings are
dangerous in the extreme. I first tried the comments option thinking it
would emulate ReSharper's capability of intelligently fixing the XML
document comments. Imagine my surprise to discover that it does nothing more
than a global search and replace in all comments. Needless to say, it
effectively destroyed the XML documentation. Fortunately, Subversion's
revert was a quick right-click away.

"Paul Bradshaw" <pbradshaw@advsol.com> wrote in message
news:dsg8ck$pbi$1@is.intellij.net...

My team recently migrated from VS2003 to VS2005 ... exclusively. This
means we all had to leave ReSharper behind.

>

Several members of the team looked at the specs for VS2005 and decided
they probably didn't need ReSharper, after all, it had refactoring, and
"code snippets" (like Live Templates), etc, etc.

>

Well, having been forced to use VS2005 without ReSharper (the EAP version
isn't stable enough to use for our projects yet, though I do test all new
builds before reverting back to "plain" VS2005), I have to say...
Microsoft's versions of ReSharper features are really, really awful.

>

A perfect example is the "foreach" code snippet. It takes me longer to
use that code snippet than it does to just type out the whole loop by
hand. And create a new one? You mean, I have to hand-code an XML file?!?
UGH! Never mind that even simple rename refactorings take too long and
have many times completely screwed up (behaving more like a global search
and replace than a true rename refactoring). And just the absence of any
equivalent to Ctrl-N (Go To Class) is enough to drive me mad.

>

Several of the people who originally said they could probably live without
ReSharper have now done a 180 after only a week with VS2005. I am really,
really hoping that ReSharper 2.0 gets stable enough to start using SOON.
In fact, I hope JetBrains just stops trying to add new features and new
bells and whistles, and just concentrates on fixing all the exceptions and
performance issues, so I can stop developing with pain and frustration,
and start Developing With Pleasure again!

>
>



0
Comment actions Permalink

For what it's worth, I have been evaluating Visual Studio 2005 over the past
several months and I generally like the new tools it makes available to us.
Even so, Visual Studio 2005 without ReSharper is like a vintage automobile
with manual steering. It gets us from Point A to Point B in style, but it
requires a lot more muscle to get any work done. ReSharper is one of the
tools that we can't live without.

"Dmitry Lomov (JetBrains)" <dmitry.lomov@jetbrains.com> wrote in message
news:dsidds$dpv$1@is.intellij.net...

Dear Christian and all EAP members,

>

it certainly occurred to us that we should probably keep you updated on
what we are actually working on in ReSharper at the moment, and should not
rely on that being obvious from the builds we publish ;)

>

Starting from build 214, ReSharper sports asynchronous start-up procedure.
This means that we In the upcoming build 218 there is no modal progress
dialog at startup at all.

>

As you may have guessed, implementing all that means major code overhaul.
Lots of code have been rewritten, lots of internal logic have been
redesigned.

>

I am not sure to what extent this work qualifies as "bug fixing" as
opposed to "new features" - it is certainly both. At the moment this major
overhaul is mostly over and we are concentrating on stability and bug
fixing.

>

As to a list of implemented features that you have posted: as you may
seen, most of those are something called "context actions" - just small
coding assistants. All of those are relatively small, and they do not
really take much resources from the team. Other "features" listed there
are in fact bordering on being called "bugs", such as making completion
aware of C# 2.0 syntax and the like.

>

Anyway, thank you all for your patience, for your criticism and your
occasional praise.
I hope that we will not yet exhausted the first, we will get lots of
constructive second and the third will get rid of its qualifier :)

>

Cheers,
Dmitry
--
Dmitry Lomov
Senior Software Developer
JetBrains Inc.
http://www.jetbrains.com
"Develop With Pleasure!"



0

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